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54 Essays on Kant vs BhagavadGita. Documents 1 - 25

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  • The Mind: Aristotle Kant And Socrates

    Daniel C. Dennet said in A Glorious Accident that, "our minds--if you like-- [are] just as real as our dreams"(Kayzer, 37). The implications of this statement are substantial, for if this is true--if our minds and our consciousness are just dreams or the constructs of our brain, what we perceive, our memories, and our sense of reality are nothing more than illusions. Not only is this scientifically a valid statement, but it forces us to

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    Essay Length: 2,327 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: January 9, 2009 By: July
  • Kant

    Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant was a man before his time. His philosophies, as outlined in Perpetual Peace, paved the way for modern political relations. Unbeknownst to his day and age, his insights were a revelation. They were seeds planted and left unsewn for 120 years. As a first and second image theorist, Kant mixes his liberal and realist views to paint a picture of "perpetual peace." His essay outlines the actions that nations should take

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    Essay Length: 2,703 Words / 11 Pages
    Submitted: January 9, 2009 By: July
  • Immanuel Kant

    Immanuel Kant 1724-1804 Immanuel Kant was born on April 22, 1724 in Konigsberg, East Prussia. He was the son of a saddler. At age 8, he entered the Collegium Fredericianum, a Latin school, where he remained for 8 1/2 years and studied the classics. He then entered the University of Konigsberg in 1740 to study philosophy, mathematics, and physics. The death of his father halted his university career so he became a private tutor. In

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    Essay Length: 3,313 Words / 14 Pages
    Submitted: February 26, 2009 By: Max
  • Kant

    Immanuel Kant, a supporter of capital punishment, offered us of the most complicated, if not ambiguous, views on the subject. In fact, he would've ironically disagreed with its modern proponents. Those who advocate capital punishment today often do so for utilitarian reasons. For example, the death sentence would protect society by not only preventing a purpertrator from committing the same crime again, it would also deter others by setting an example. Kant would've argued the

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    Essay Length: 319 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 12, 2009 By: Mike
  • Kant The Man

    Kant’s Principals In the Foundation of the Metaphysics of Morals, the author, Immanuel Kant, tries to form a base by rejecting all ethical theories that are connected to consequences, and then focusing on our ethical motivations and actions. Kant wants to derive good characters out of contingently right actions. He believes that everything is contingent (everything can have good or bad worth, depending on how it is used). So he is trying to find the

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    Essay Length: 1,164 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: November 15, 2009 By: Mikki
  • Kant

    The form- is given by the intellect, independent of all experience, a priori, and signifies the function, manner and law of knowing and acting, which the subject finds in itself prior to all experience. The matter- is the subjective sensations which we receive from the external world. Through these two elements the benefits of Rationalism and Empiricism are united in the same judgment: the form represents the universal and necessary element, while the matter represents

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    Essay Length: 458 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 18, 2009 By: Top
  • An Overview Of Immanuel Kant

    The exploration into Immanuel Kant's thought is one of, insight, perception, and open-mindedness. His work in the field of philosophy and intellectual development spanned over thirty-five years. He wrote on virtually all philosophical topics but his love was in the branch of metaphysics. His role in the evolvement of modern thought is vast and profound. Immanuel Kant was born, lived, and died in Konigsberg, East Prussia. Although he never left East Prussia, he is one

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    Essay Length: 1,197 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: November 19, 2009 By: Tasha
  • Kant Vs Aristotle

    The Platonic Rationalist and Aristotelian Empirical Way of Thinking Philosophical Inquiry Section ON22 Erich Grunder Jim Cook 3/2/2007 During the 17th and 18th century two philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, arose carving for themselves a trench in the philosophical world. We can see the biggest distinction between the two in their theories of how we know things exist. The traditions of Plato and Aristotle have been dubbed rationalism and empiricism respectively. Under these traditions many well

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    Essay Length: 1,294 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: December 5, 2009 By: Kevin
  • Kant Rules

    THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all. Mr. Speaker, Vice President Cheney, members of Congress, members of the Supreme Court and diplomatic corps, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens: Today our nation lost a beloved, graceful, courageous woman who called America to its founding ideals and carried on a noble dream. Tonight we are comforted by the hope of a glad reunion with the husband who was taken so long ago, and we are grateful for the good

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    Essay Length: 1,570 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: December 13, 2009 By: Steve
  • Kant

    Kant starts off making two distinctions regarding kinds of knowledge, empirical/rational and formal/material. Empirical or experience-based knowledge is contrasted with rational knowledge, which is independent of experience. This distinction between empirical and rational knowledge rests on a difference in sources of evidence used to support the two different kinds of knowledge. Formal is contrasted with material knowledge. Formal knowledge has no specific subject matter; it is about the general structure of thinking about any subject

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    Essay Length: 708 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 14, 2009 By: Max
  • Kant On Euthanasia

    Provide a close analysis of the following passage, discussing the dramatist's use of diction, register, rhythm and metre, imagery, tone and ANY OTHER dramatic resources which seem relevant to you. Also discuss why your chosen extract is important within the context of Dr. Faustus as a whole. Scene 5 FAUSTUS My heart's so hardened I cannot repent! Scarce can I name salvation, faith, or heaven, But fearful echoes thunders in mine ears, "Faustus, thou are

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    Essay Length: 2,274 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: December 15, 2009 By: Mike
  • Kants Categorical Imperitave Applied

    Kant describes the categorical imperative as "expressed by an ought and thereby indicate the relation of an objective law of reason to a will that is not necessarily determined by this law because of its subjective constitution." In other words, a categorical impetrative is a command of morality that applies everywhere at all times no matter what, without exception. Kant describes two forms of imperatives, hypothetical and categorical. Kant defines the hypothetical imperative as "an

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    Essay Length: 552 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 19, 2009 By: Jack
  • An Overview Of Immanuel Kant

    An overview of Immanuel Kant By Scott Haywood Philosophy 101 Harold McSwain, Ph.D. The exploration into Immanuel Kant's thought is one of, insight, perception, and open-mindedness. His work in the field of philosophy and intellectual development spanned over thirty-five years. He wrote on virtually all philosophical topics but his love was in the branch of metaphysics. His role in the evolvement of modern thought is vast and profound. Immanuel Kant was born, lived, and died

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    Essay Length: 1,210 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: December 22, 2009 By: Mike
  • Kant And Morality

    Kant and Morality Kant had a different ethical system which was based on reason. According to Kant reason was the fundamental authority in determining morality. All humans possess the ability to reason, and out of this ability comes two basic commands: the hypothetical imperative and the categorical imperative. In focusing on the categorical imperative, in this essay I will reveal the underlying relationship between reason and duty. The categorical imperative suggests that a course of

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    Essay Length: 584 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 23, 2009 By: Steve
  • Immanuel Kant’s Ethics of Pure Duty

    Immanuel Kant's Ethics Of Pure Duty In Comparison To John Stuart Mill's Utilitarian Ethics Of Justice Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill are philosophers who addressed the issues of morality in terms of how moral traditions are formed. Immanuel Kant has presented one viewpoint in The Grounding For The Metaphysics of Morals that is founded on his belief that the worth of man is inherent in his ability to reason. John Stuart Mill holds another

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    Essay Length: 2,803 Words / 12 Pages
    Submitted: December 26, 2009 By: Yan
  • Kant Moral Ethics

    Immanuel Kant's moral theory can be best explained by comparing it to a math equation. Kant's moral system will always hold true no matter what the circumstance just like how two plus two will always equal four. According to Kant, our lives should be lived according to maxims that can be willed into universal law (Kant, Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, p 303). However the action regarding a moral decision is not judged

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    Essay Length: 1,479 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: December 26, 2009 By: David
  • Kant And Mills Theories

    Kant and Mill's Theories In July of 1994, Paul J. Hill, a former Presbyterian minister and later a pro-life activist, was prosecuted for killing Dr. John Britton, an abortion performing doctor, and James Barrett, a volunteer, outside a clinic in Pensacola, Florida. Prior to this, Hill commented on the murder of Dr. David Gunn, another abortion performing doctor, stating that it was a "biblically justified homicide (P. 215)." This statement shows how strong Hill's beliefs

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    Essay Length: 2,145 Words / 9 Pages
    Submitted: December 27, 2009 By: Mikki
  • Kant

    Utilitarianism is a consequential perspective, in that, a decision in based on the effects it ----will have on society and what it will generally lead to. Also, the utility or usefulness of an action is determined by the amount of happiness that will result. Therefore, no action in itself can be deemed wrong; consequence alone are the important matter. Using this principle, one should consider the possible results of each potential action. One clear flaw

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    Essay Length: 1,942 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: January 2, 2010 By: Kevin
  • Kant’s Formalism Theory

    Kant's Formalism Theory The theories of Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher, have had an impact on the formulation and shaping of ethics today. Immanuel Kant graced this earth from 1724 to 1804. During his eighty year life time, he formulated many interesting ideas regarding ethical conduct and motivation. Kant is strictly a non-consequentialist philosopher, which means that he believes that a person's choices should have nothing to do with the desired outcome, but instead mankind

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    Essay Length: 737 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 4, 2010 By: Venidikt
  • Kant

    http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~curd/110WK11.html Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785) H. J. Paton: “In spite of its horrifying title Kant’s Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals is one of the small books which are truly great: it has exercised on human thought an influence almost ludicrously disproportionate to its size.” Morality is a priori For Kant, universality and necessity are the hallmarks of the a priori. Morality commands universally (all rational beings, not just

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    Essay Length: 1,519 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: January 14, 2010 By: Edward
  • Kant’s Dialectic

    The discussion of Kant's metaphysics and epistemology so far (including the Analytic of Principles)has been confined primarily to the section of the Critique of Pure Reason that Kant calls the Transcendental Analytic. The purpose of the Analytic, we are told, is "the rarely attempted dissection of the power of the understanding itself." (A 65/B 90). Kant's project has been to develop the full argument for his theory about the mind's contribution to knowledge of the

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    Essay Length: 1,276 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: January 16, 2010 By: Andrew
  • Utiltarianism Vs Kant

    Kant had a different ethical system which was based on reason. According to Kant reason was the fundamental authority in determining morality. All humans possess the ability to reason, and out of this ability comes two basic commands: the hypothetical imperative and the categorical imperative. In focusing on the categorical imperative, in this essay I will reveal the underlying relationship between reason and duty. The categorical imperative suggests that a course of action must be

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    Essay Length: 808 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 24, 2010 By: Jessica
  • Kant: The Pursuit Of Fundamental Freedom

    Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are the signs that all men deserve a fundamental freedom. The fact that man has the ability of reasoning calls for the need of a self-government. Reasoning will help the world progress towards an ideal society. Mankind declares its independence from other species of animals through the use of reason. The mind of man creates all the difference as he is able to choose his own way of

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    Essay Length: 496 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 24, 2010 By: Jon
  • Kant V. Mill

    Kantianism and Utilitarianism are two theories that attempt to answer the moral nature of human beings. Immanuel Kant's moral system is based on a belief that reason is the final authority for morality. John Stuart Mill's moral system is based on the theory known as utilitarianism, which is based upon utility, or doing what produces the greatest happiness. One of Kant's lasting contributions to moral philosophy was his emphasis on the notion of respect for

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    Essay Length: 983 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 29, 2010 By: Mikki
  • Kant Vs Mill

    Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant was born, lived and passed away in his home town of Konigsberg. He lived from 1724 to 1804. He studied at the local university and later returned to tutor and lecture students. It wasn't until he met an English merchant by the name of Joseph Green that Kant learned of David Hume and began to develop his ideas of morals and values. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (1781) is believed by

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    Essay Length: 505 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 29, 2010 By: Mike

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