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Religion

This section covers a wide range of issues that are crucial to understanding the doctrine and basic principles of religion. This section also contains historical information about religions all over the world.

2,115 Essays on Religion. Documents 271 - 300

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  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism is a set of teachings first influenced by Siddhartha Gautama, who is also known as Gautama Buddha or simply just Buddha. Buddha stands for Awakened One, and one of the principle beliefs for people who practice Buddhism is to find this awakening in life. Gautama first began his teachings in Northern India and has spread throughout all of Asia (Molloy 124). As far as religious afterlife is concerned, Buddhists do not believe in eternal

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    Essay Length: 1,691 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: January 27, 2010 By: Steve
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the biggest religions founded in India in the 6th and 5th cent. BC by Siddhartha Gautama, called the Buddha. One of the great Asian religions teaches the practice of the observance of moral precepts. The basic doctrines include the four noble truths taught by the Buddha. Since it was first introduced into China from India, Buddhism has had a history that has been characterized by periods of sometimes awkward and

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    Essay Length: 2,339 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: February 8, 2010 By: Jessica
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Ravi Parikh Phil 205 5/20/02 Presentation Proposal 1. My essay will basically help the reader get an understanding about what ethics and global ethics are and how they are related to Buddhism. It will also help give a brief understanding on the history of Buddhism. Some key points that I will focus on will be, what is so ethical within Buddhism? And How is Buddhism approach Global Ethics? 2. Finally in the last part of

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    Essay Length: 259 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 10, 2010 By: Steve
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism Buddhism is an important religion in most countries of Asia. It is one of the world’s oldest and greatest religions practiced today. Buddhism teaches the practices of and the moral observance of moral concepts. When it was founded, Buddhism rejected important views of Hinduism. It questioned the authority of priesthood. The Buddhist movement was open to all people denying that a person’s worth could be judged by their blood. Buddhism was founded in the

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    Essay Length: 654 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: February 15, 2010 By: Tasha
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    People around the world speak of American influence in politics, business, and merchandise. The terms ‘globalization’ or ‘global interdependence’ are recently being more understood by most when defining them with relation to corporations, environmental issues, and the modern economy. Can these terms be used to describe the religious beliefs in Canada? The religious life of North American society does not find its roots here at home. We live in a Christian domain. Its roots

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    Essay Length: 1,184 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: February 15, 2010 By: Mike
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism is often described as a religion[1] and a collection of various philosophies, based initially on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, known as Gautama Buddha.[2] To many, however, Buddhism is a set of spiritual teachings and practices rather than a religion.[3] [4] Buddhism is also known as Buddha Dharma or Dhamma, which means roughly the "teachings of the Awakened One" in Sanskrit and Pali, languages of ancient Buddhist texts. Buddhism began around 5th century BCE

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    Essay Length: 365 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 3, 2010 By: Mike
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism Buddhism, like most other religions, originated in a particular place at a particular time, and its roots are in forms and ideas that were part of the environment in which it developed. The most important of these areas at the time of the Buddha was the valley of the Ganges river which flows from west to east across most of northern India. It was here that the great religions of India first arose

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    Essay Length: 1,056 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 4, 2010 By: Venidikt
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the world's major religions, with between 230 to 500 million followers, most of them living in Asia. Buddhism branches off into many other religions just as Christianity does. The two main branches of Buddhism are Mahayana and Theravada. The word Buddha can be translated to awakened or enlightened. Gautama Buddha, the founder of Buddhism, taught around 5th century B.C. in northeast India and Nepal. Most Buddhists believe in rebirth and

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    Essay Length: 1,121 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 21, 2010 By: Vika
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism What teachings would a convert to Buddhism have to accept? A convert Buddhism would have to take into account many guidelines to help them progress on the spiritual path to enlightenment, but as these teachings are only guidelines a Buddhist does not have to follow them. One of the most basic Buddhist beliefs is known as the '3 Refuges'. A refuge is a place of shelter and safety from harm. The 3 things or

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    Essay Length: 4,081 Words / 17 Pages
    Submitted: March 23, 2010 By: July
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the major religions of the world and in fact the fourth largest religion today. “It is the majority tradition of the Asian countries of Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Tibet, Bhutan, and Japan (Lester 11).I chose to study this religion because I do not know too much about it, and it holds a different view from the Christian religion. It is so interesting and fascinating to study about

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    Essay Length: 1,130 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 28, 2010 By: Kevin
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    An Introduction to Buddhist Archaeology, Gina L. Barnes. World Archaeology, Vol.27, No. 2, Buddhist Archaeology. (Oct., 1995), pp. 165-182. Taylor & Francis, Ltd. This reading on Buddhism and it’s Archeology was not only very interesting and informative but it was also written very strait forward and easily understood by the reader. The points were clear and reinforced with factual information. It talks about the origin and concepts of what makes up the Buddhist religion. Along

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    Essay Length: 540 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: April 4, 2010 By: Steve
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism is a religion that has recently been brought to the attention of more people in society. People are intrigued by the life of Buddhists because of their ability to live with very little possessions of their own. Most people do not realize that Buddhism is not only a religion it is also a way of life. Buddhism is a choice that people decide to study, or they are born into families that study Buddhism.

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    Essay Length: 2,311 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: April 11, 2010 By: Steve
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism In reading this account on Buddhism, the goal is, for you (the reader) to understand a fascinating belief system, that has been around since before Christ ever set foot on this earth. This will provide a connection to the minds and hearts of the people who live and die in this sacred world, so that an understanding may be arroused and ultimatly give an acceptance as well as a clear path to minister to

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    Essay Length: 3,791 Words / 16 Pages
    Submitted: May 3, 2010 By: Jack
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    High in the mountains of the Himalayas chants ring out from the Tibetan monastery. For most this is a dream-like vacation to a far away land. For some of the people who live in Tibet and India this is everyday life as a Buddhist. Buddhism revolves around a strict code of daily rituals and meditations. To an outsider they can seem mystical or even odd, but these are the paths to enlightenment and spiritual salvation.

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    Essay Length: 1,240 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: May 16, 2010 By: Mike
  • Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism In reading this account on Buddhism, the goal is, for you (the reader) to understand a fascinating belief system, that has been around since before Christ ever set foot on this earth. This will provide a connection to the minds and hearts of the people who live and die in this sacred world, so that an understanding may be arroused and ultimatly give an acceptance as well as a clear path to minister to

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    Essay Length: 3,791 Words / 16 Pages
    Submitted: May 24, 2010 By: Bred
  • Buddhism & "no-Self"

    Buddhism & "no-Self"

    Eastern enlightenment religions have been gaining popularity throughout the western world for the past few decades, with many people attracted to a “different” way of experiencing religion. As with many other enlightenment religions, Buddhism requires disciples to understand concepts that are not readily explainable: one such concept is that of no-self. In this essay I shall discuss the no-self from a number of modern perspectives; however, as no-self is difficult to describe I shall focus

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    Essay Length: 253 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 18, 2010 By: Top
  • Buddhism a Protest to Hinduism or an offshoot?

    Buddhism a Protest to Hinduism or an offshoot?

    Few scholars would disagree that at the time of the Buddha, a very heterogeneous and actively developing religious culture flourished in India. This generally accepted historical reality proves that Buddhism was neither a protest against, or an offshoot of Hinduism (this view is even expressed for example in the Encyclopaedia Brittanica). Buddhism simply proved to be one of the more successful new schools of thought within a large variety of philosophies, especially after King Ashoka

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    Essay Length: 330 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 3, 2010 By: Mike
  • Buddhism and Anglican Religion

    Buddhism and Anglican Religion

    Buddhism + Anglicanism Buddhism and Anglicanism are two exceedingly popular Religions. Both religions have very different views on their funerary practices and beliefs. They have incredibly diverse ideas on what happens to you once you depart this life and the potential continuation of another. Buddhism and Anglicanism are only slightly compatible on the issue of funerary practices and the possibilities after death. It is quite well known that Buddhists believe in reincarnation however this is

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    Essay Length: 1,118 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: December 13, 2009 By: Tommy
  • Buddhism and Celibacy

    Buddhism and Celibacy

    A Life of Celibacy; Buddhism and Sex Buddhism which just may be the most tolerant religion in the world, constitutes teachings that can coexist with almost any other religions. Buddhism began with Siddhartha Gautama who lived in northern India in the sixth or fifth century B.C.E. The religion has guidelines in two forms in which Buddhist followers must follow. These are the Four Noble Truths and the Eight fold Path. Buddha taught that man is

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    Essay Length: 1,901 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: November 20, 2009 By: Monika
  • Buddhism and Christianity

    Buddhism and Christianity

    In the early sixth century Christianity was evolving at a rapid pace. The spread of Christianity was not only moving westward through Europe, but it was also moving eastward down the Silk Road. The eastward spread of Christianity was primarily a form of Christianity known as Nestorianism, after the teachings of Nestorius, a fifth century patriarch. By 635 Nestorian Christianity had reached the heart of China spreading through all of Persia and India. During the

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    Essay Length: 1,451 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: December 4, 2009 By: Anna
  • Buddhism and Ecology

    Buddhism and Ecology

    If there was ever a culture that truly cared for the Earth, it was that of Buddhism. Buddhism itself is often known for commitment to World ecology. This is explored in the essay, Relational Holism, by David Landis Barnhill, in the book, Deep Ecology and World Religions. The subject of holism is brought to us many times and often acknowledgement of critical views is used to help convey the information. Beginning with a strong statement

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    Essay Length: 327 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: April 20, 2010 By: Yan
  • Buddhism and Suicide

    Buddhism and Suicide

    Thesis: Bibliography on Buddhist Ethics http://jbe.gold.ac.uk/7/harvey001.html#suicide Incoporate western philoosophy? Western ethics? First part- Bacvkground on Buddhist doctrine concerning suicide 1. No Buddhist Should Commit Suicide The Milindapanha 98. from the Vinaya Pitaka section on the Order. Warren, Henry Clarke. Buddhism in Translations. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Private Ltd. (1995). King Nagasena explains why a buddhist (priest) may not kill himself. He claims that the world needs Buddhists to spread understanding and enlightenment (Boddhisatva way). 2. Breaking

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    Essay Length: 1,249 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: December 8, 2009 By: Jon
  • Buddhism and the Matrix

    Buddhism and the Matrix

    The One In the film The Matrix Keanu Reeves plays Thomas A. Anderson, who is a man living a double life. One part of his life consists of working for a highly respectable software company. The second part of his life he is a hacker under the alias "Neo." One day Neo is approached by Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) and is taught that everything he thought was real was actually The Matrix, a computer program developed

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    Essay Length: 1,019 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: May 25, 2010 By: Top
  • Buddhism in 3 Pages

    Buddhism in 3 Pages

    Buddhism is based on “the awakening” of one man. Buddhism holds that life is full of suffering which comes from desire. The ultimate goal of Buddhism is nirvana, the extinguishing of human desire and suffering. This is accomplished by seeking enlightenment to end desire, and thus end suffering. Since desire is inherent in human nature, this results in an effort to renounce the self and “awaken” to the truth of reality. Once a seeker has

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    Essay Length: 997 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 23, 2010 By: Max
  • Buddhism in America

    Buddhism in America

    Buddhism is a religion with millions of followers in the United States, including traditionally Buddhist Asian Americans as well as non-Asian converts. While in the large history of Buddhism it is relatively new to the United States, it’s introduction to the U.S. is interesting because is a new and different environment for Buddhists. Because it is relatively new to the United States, it developed an already interesting history and continues to do so as America

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    Essay Length: 1,964 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: April 19, 2010 By: Venidikt
  • Buddhism Speech

    Buddhism Speech

    Today I am giving an informative speech on Buddhism. Now, "informative" is the key word here. I just want to reasure everyone that I am simply going to explain some of the philosophy of Buddhism. I am not, however, trying to sway your beliefs or views on life in ANY way. Instead, I'm going to share with you some of the basic things that I know, and however you choose to use the information, if

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    Essay Length: 839 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: November 17, 2009 By: Wendy
  • Buddhism Vs Hinduism

    Buddhism Vs Hinduism

    Buddhism and Hinduism are known to be the most popular beliefs in the world. Hinduism, the oldest known religion, is extremely rich with hundreds of gods, symbolistic rituals, and beliefs. It is believed to have been established around 1500 B.C. with no evidence of one founder. Buddhism on the other hand has a definite founder, Siddhartha Gautama, who is otherwise known as the Buddha or Enlightened One who lived from 565 to 483 B.C. Both

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    Essay Length: 864 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: February 4, 2010 By: Jessica
  • Buddhism: Instant Zen

    Buddhism: Instant Zen

    Buddhism is about finding ones way to nirvana. It is a journey that could take thousands of lifetimes. Zen Buddhism is a direct pointing to reality, of a faster path to enlightenment. In Instant Zen, he short aphorisms all contain different Buddhist truths and “life realities”. By understanding the short passages, one can see the messages hidden in the parables. The messages in these parables all relate to the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path,

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    Essay Length: 648 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 28, 2009 By: Fatih
  • Buddhism: Things I Find Interesting

    Buddhism: Things I Find Interesting

    Buddhism: Things I Find Interesting As I was reading the selected portions of the book for this chapter, I came across a few things that I found interesting. At first I did not catch them, but after I went back and reread the selections, I found these things, that I thought were intriguing. Buddhism is supposedly a non-theistic religion. However, in the reading titled "The Majjhim-Nikaya: Questions Which Lend Not to Edification" (5.1) and in

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    Essay Length: 410 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 12, 2009 By: Tommy
  • Buddhist

    Buddhist

    Buddhist Religion 2 Buddhism is not a single monolithic religion. Many of its adherents have combined the teachings of the Buddha with local religious rituals, beliefs and customs. Little conflict occurs, because Buddhism at its core is a philosophical system to which such additions can be easily grafted. After the Buddha's death, splits occurred. There are now three main systems of thought within Buddhism which are geographically and philosophically separate. Each tradition in turn has

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    Essay Length: 769 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: March 3, 2010 By: Wendy

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