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5,862 Essays on American History. Documents 4,471 - 4,500

  • The Civil War

    The Civil War

    Several paralles can be drawn between I believe the majority of human beings are born with a clear sense of what is right and what is not right, ethically speaking. Now, assuming that we are all “born” with this sense, and that our ethical beliefs develop over time and with life experiences, I do not believe it would be appropriate for an organization to make attempts to alter a person’s ethical “make-up”. I also believe

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    Essay Length: 660 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: November 26, 2009 By: Andrew
  • The Civil War

    The Civil War

    Background The Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 was a Federal law which was written with the intention of enforcing a section of the United States Constitution that required the return of runaway slaves. It sought to force the authorities in free states to return fugitive slaves to their masters. In practice, however, the law was rarely enforced because the northern states were against slavery. The act protected property rights of white slave-owners while violating the

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    Essay Length: 637 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 12, 2009 By: Vika
  • The Civil War

    The Civil War

    In the Civil War the North had many advantages over the South. The South was outnumbered, out supplied, and pushed into a corner using military tactics. Many things changed because of the Civil War. The military tactics used by the North changed how war was fought from then on. Many changes were made politically; some were only temporary, while others were permanent. After the war was over, the country was reunited and the image of

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    Essay Length: 792 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 9, 2010 By: Vika
  • The Civil War

    The Civil War

    The Civil War was one of our nation’s greatest and saddest events. Many elements came into play in causing the war. The debates of the annexation of Texas, new land acquired from the Mexican War, all of the debates of the 1850’s, the rise of the Republican party and their presidential nomination, Abraham Lincoln were major factors. Slavery was not the only problem, everything dealing with the expansion of our western borders. In the 1830’s,

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    Essay Length: 587 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 17, 2010 By: Stenly
  • The Civil War

    The Civil War

    The Civil War is acknowledged as the greatest war in American history. Known as "The War that Never Ended". Nearly three million fought, and 600,000 died. It was the only war fought on American soil by Americans, and for that reason we have always been fascinated with The Civil War. On April 12, 1861, at 4:30 AM, Confederates under General Pierre Beauregard opened fire upon Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina with the use of

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    Essay Length: 492 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 27, 2010 By: Mike
  • The Civil War

    The Civil War

    The American Civil War started with Abraham Lincoln's victory in the presidential election of 1860, which triggered South Carolina's secession from the Union. Leaders in the state had long been waiting for an event that might unite the South against the antislavery forces. Once the election returns were certain, a special South Carolina convention declared "that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other states under the name of the "United States of America'

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    Essay Length: 579 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: March 11, 2010 By: regina
  • The Civil War and Its Effects

    The Civil War and Its Effects

    Civil war From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other uses, see civil war (disambiguation). See list of civil wars for individual examples. A civil war is a war in which parties within the same culture, society or nationality fight for political power or control of an area. Some civil wars are also categorized as revolutions when major societal restructuring is a possible outcome of the conflict. An insurgency, whether successful or

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    Essay Length: 1,527 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: April 29, 2010 By: July
  • The Civil War to the Modern Day

    The Civil War to the Modern Day

    The Civil War to the Modern Day The Civil War was the bloodiest war in American History. Even though the war was a tragedy because of the life lost, it helped to better the United States to this day. One might wonder how the Civil War has affected different aspects of the United States over the years. If one were to examine events that took place after 1865, they would be able to find similarities

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    Essay Length: 905 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 30, 2009 By: Mikki
  • The Civil War Was a National Tragedy That Could Not Have Been Avoided

    The Civil War Was a National Tragedy That Could Not Have Been Avoided

    “The Civil War was a national tragedy that could not have been avoided.” In the time leading up to the Civil War, the United States was struggling to stay united and strong. The leaders were weak, individuals were going public with the truths of cruelty to slaves, and conflicting rebellious acts were occurring. This national tragedy could have in no way been avoided. Franklin Pierce was an indecisive, inconspicuous man whose not so stellar attributes

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    Essay Length: 573 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 7, 2010 By: Yan
  • The Classical Hollywood Narrative Style

    The Classical Hollywood Narrative Style

    The Classical Hollywood Narrative Style is the most commonly used technique in film creation. The term was coined by David Bordwell, Janet Staiger and Kristin Thompson in their study of Hollywood films between the years of 1917 to 1960. A film in this style would follow a set of rules which are unwritten but commonly accepted amongst film makers. This type of film is structured narratively with a clearly defined conflict which is introduced early

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    Essay Length: 1,021 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: April 28, 2011 By: caonima
  • The Closing of the Frontier

    The Closing of the Frontier

    Section I- The Closing of the Frontier A) The Non-Indians that settled in the Great Plains rapidly was do to the search for silver and gold. 1.) The Continental Road, system was a major factor for such settlement it carried people to the west. Do to the enormous Buffalo and cattle ranching gave birth to the cowboys. 2.) The architectural reform lied to people that were emigrating from Scandinavia and Russia these reforms were

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    Essay Length: 284 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 12, 2009 By: Fonta
  • The Cold War

    The Cold War

    In the post World War II era, a war arose between the Soviet Union and the United States, but in reality there was never really any documented fighting between the two nations, thus spawning the catch phrase "Cold War." Even though both countries were ready to go to war at the blink of an eye and almost did, the powers-that-be never got the nerve to authorize a nuclear war that would have made World War

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    Essay Length: 2,285 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: December 5, 2008 By: Fonta
  • The Cold War

    The Cold War

    The Cold War The Cold War had a major impact on United States history and the histories of many other nations worldwide. The war was made up of many different things to include the United States and the Soviet Unions' goals, major U.S. policies, major events that evolved in Asia, and the affects the war had on American life. This war helped shape history and many of the different societies that were involved. The Cold

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    Essay Length: 1,149 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: January 26, 2009 By: Stenly
  • The Cold War

    The Cold War

    In the post World War II era, a war arose between the Soviet Union and the United States, but in reality there was never really any documented fighting between the two nations, thus spawning the catch phrase "Cold War." Even though both countries were ready to go to war at the blink of an eye and almost did, the powers-that-be never got the nerve to authorize a nuclear war that would have made World War

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 2,285 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: December 5, 2009 By: Tasha
  • The Cold War and Truman

    The Cold War and Truman

    The end of World War II presented an opportunity for Winston Churchill to regain some of the power and influence that the Imperialistic British Empire once possessed. Churchill took advantage of the trust and respect that the American public and President Truman shared about his character. He saw Truman’s lack of political experience as an opportunity to restore British imperial authority. Winston Churchill tainted Harry Truman’s beliefs and preservations about Russia, because his personal

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    Essay Length: 1,366 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: May 21, 2010 By: Steve
  • The Cold War Climate and the Domino Effect

    The Cold War Climate and the Domino Effect

    The Cold War Climate and the Domino Theory During World War II, the U.S. and the Soviet Union (Russia and its member states) - the U.S.S.R. - were allies against Germany and Japan. They won the war together. But the two countries had very different ideas on governing. The U.S. believed in the right of people to elect their leaders and live freely; the U.S.S.R. believed in limited freedom and a strong, dominant central government.

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    Essay Length: 2,060 Words / 9 Pages
    Submitted: November 22, 2009 By: Jon
  • The Cold War Examined

    The Cold War Examined

    The Cold War had an incredibly profound effect on the United States. It effected the country politically, economically, as well as culturally. Use High Noon as an allegory of the 1950s to examine issues of conformity, individualism, community, and political commitment in the context of Congressional investigations such as that of HUAC into the activities of the Hollywood 10. In this scenario, Marshal Will Kane represents individuals who were willing to confront the political

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    Essay Length: 1,143 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: May 15, 2010 By: Max
  • The Cold War Summarized

    The Cold War Summarized

    The period of tension between the world’s two superpowers fallowing the Second World War is known as the Cold War. This period was full of tension and fear that the United States and the USSR would destroy each other and the world with their arsenals of atomic weapons. The seeds of this rivalry were planted nearly a quarter of a century before its actual commencement with the Revolution of 1918 in Russia. The Cold War

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    Essay Length: 1,613 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: November 20, 2009 By: Stenly
  • The Colfax Massacre

    The Colfax Massacre

    The Colfax Massacre, one of the bloodiest mass-murders during the Reconstruction, took place on April 13, 1873 in Colfax, Louisiana. The massacre / riot was a result of the gubernatorial elections of 1872 held in Louisiana. The election was between McEnery, the white conservative legislature candidate, and William Pitt Kellogg, a carpetbagger (a Northerner who came to the South to help the blacks) of the Radical Republican Party. The election resulted in two different outcomes.

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    Essay Length: 899 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: November 30, 2009 By: Fatih
  • The Colonies by 1763: A New Society?

    The Colonies by 1763: A New Society?

    Between the settlement at Jamestown in 1607 and the Treaty of Paris in 1763, the most important change that occurred in the colonies was the emergence of a society quite different from that in England. Changes in religion, economics, politics and social structure illustrate this Americanization of the transplanted Europeans. By 1763, although some colonies still maintained established churches, other colonies had accomplished a virtual revolution for religious toleration and separation of church and state.

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    Essay Length: 473 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 5, 2008 By: Fonta
  • The Columbian Exchange

    The Columbian Exchange

    The Columbian Exchange is the exchange of plants, animals, food, and diseases between Europe and the Americas. In 1492, when Christopher Columbus came to America, he saw plants and animals he had never seen before so he took them back with him to Europe. Columbus began the trade routes which had never been established between Europe and the Americas so his voyages initiated the interchange of plants between the Eastern and Western Hemispheres, which

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    Essay Length: 1,121 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: February 10, 2010 By: Steve
  • The Coming of Colonists

    The Coming of Colonists

    The coming of colonists in the seventeenth century was the result of careful planning and management, and of considerable expense and risk. Settlers had to be transported three thousand miles across the sea. They needed utensils, clothing, seed, tools, building materials, livestock, arms, ammunition. In contrast to the colonization policies of other countries and other periods, the emigration from England was not fostered by the government. Rather, the initiative was taken by unofficial groups or

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    Essay Length: 624 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 1, 2009 By: Steve
  • The Community of Enslaved Africans and Their Religious & Spiritual Practices

    The Community of Enslaved Africans and Their Religious & Spiritual Practices

    The Community of Enslaved Africans and their Religious & Spiritual Practices. During a most dark and dismal time in our nations history, we find that the Africans who endured horrible circumstances during slavery, found ways of peace and hope in their religious beliefs. During slavery, African’s where able to survive unbearable conditions by focusing on their spirituality. Christianity was amongst the slave community. Being that the vast majority of the slave community was born in

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    Essay Length: 1,738 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: December 14, 2009 By: David
  • The Comparison of Rene Descartes to Paul Churchland

    The Comparison of Rene Descartes to Paul Churchland

    Rene Descartes and Paul Churchland are both well respected philosophers with different out-looks on the mind and body relationship. Descartes achieved many great things in his time, but at the time that he wrote Meditations on First Philosophy he seemed to be borderline insane. His ideas are too drastic and gloomy, where as Churchland’s ideas in his writing Eliminitative Materialism seems to be agreeable and bright. Rene Descartes was a famous French Philosopher, mathematician, and

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    Essay Length: 1,004 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: January 8, 2010 By: Mike
  • The Compromies of 1877

    The Compromies of 1877

    By 1876, federal troops had been withdrawn from all of the southern states except for South Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana and the Democrats had returned to power in all the southern states except for those three. This would play a key role in the presidential election of 1876, which was perhaps the most disputed presidential election in American history. The nation was tired of Reconstruction policies that kept federal troops in the South and the

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    Essay Length: 721 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: February 19, 2010 By: Yan
  • The Compromise of 1877

    The Compromise of 1877

    In 1876, there was to be a new elected a new president in the United States of America. The two candidates were Rutherford B. Hayes as a republican and Samuel J. Tilden as a democrat. This election was known as one of the most controversial elections in the history of America do to the end results of the new elected president. The Presidential election of 1876 was close between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel J.

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    Essay Length: 354 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 29, 2010 By: Monika
  • The Concept of Manifest Destiny

    The Concept of Manifest Destiny

    John L. O’Sullivan is given credit to creating the concept as well as the term “Manifest Destiny”. O’Sullivan was the editor of the nationalist magazine, Democratic Review, which gave him the opportunity to introduce the idea of Manifest Destiny, and all it entails, to Americans. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines ‘Manifest Destiny’ as a future event accepted as inevitable. According to O’Sullivan Manifest Destiny was inevitable, and as history shows, he was correct. In 1839, John

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    Essay Length: 464 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 8, 2010 By: Monika
  • The Conflict Between Americans and the British

    The Conflict Between Americans and the British

    The conflict between the Americans and the British had many roots. Many say the roots of the Revolution came due to economics however, politics and independent thinking greatly led to the Revolutionary War. The colonist developed independence fueled by political philosophers making them realize they could survive without Great Britain. Another thing that was a root towards the revolution is the acts that the British passed on the American Colonist. The last root was

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    Essay Length: 395 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: April 7, 2010 By: Janna
  • The Conflicts Between Great Britain and the North American Colonies

    The Conflicts Between Great Britain and the North American Colonies

    The conflicts between Great Britain and The North American Colonies varied between economic problems along with political and social controversies and differences. Everything from people simply disagreeing with the ways of Great Britain to finally Declaring Independence from them and becoming their own country. There were many conflicts throughout the years, but all of which helped create the United States of America to be what it is today. A main part of the controversies

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    Essay Length: 596 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: October 22, 2014 By: emmaschweis
  • The Constitution

    The Constitution

    Holography is the process of storing information reflected off objects via light and using that information to produce a photograph of that object. The photograph has characteristics that bear striking resemblance to that of the real object. Unlike regular photographs taken, holograms can show the observer different perspectives of the object rather then just the front of an object (Jeong & Knowles, 1978). The main developments and discoveries dealing with holograms started with Dennis Gabor.

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    Essay Length: 314 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 11, 2009 By: Jon
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