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Last update: August 25, 2014
  • Analysis of London by William Blake

    Analysis of London by William Blake

    Written in four stanzas, London by William Blake uses an ‘A, B, A, B’ rhythmic pattern. More in a lyrical form, the poem is basically about someone where he wanders in London and describes his thoughts and observations. He sees poverty, misery, and despair on people’s face and notices how London is a hideous and corrupted place with injustice in every corner. The poem starts with a sinister and gloomy atmosphere which quickly gives an

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    Essay Length: 306 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 15, 2009 By: July
  • London by William Blake

    London by William Blake

    William Blake, London London by William Blake is a poem characterised by its dark and overbearing tone. It is a glimpse at a period of England’s history (particularly London) during war and poverty, experienced by the narrator as he walks through the streets. Using personification it draws a great human aspect to its representation of thoughts and beliefs of the narrator. The author uses a rhyme scheme that mirrors the pace of walking. The pace

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    Essay Length: 547 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 14, 2010 By: Janna
  • William Blake’s Poem London

    William Blake’s Poem London

    There can be little doubt that William Blake’s poem ‘London’ demonstrates the weakness and frailty of human nature, and the disregard the individual (or institution) has for his fellow man. Blake’s character wanders through the streets of London observing the actions occurring therein, revealing to us the dark disposition of humanity. Each verse repeats and echoes this idea with symbology, rhythm, and illustration. The opening stanza clearly shows mans pre-occupation with all things economic and

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    Essay Length: 1,023 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: February 4, 2010 By: Yan
  • William Blake’s London

    William Blake’s London

    London, by William Blake William Blake’s poem, London, is a very dark and rich work that reflects Blake’s feelings of disillusionment and sorrow over the inequalities he saw in London, England. First published in 1794 in Songs of Experience, London shows the horrors and suffering that were commonplace in Europe at that time. William Blake was born in London, England, into meager circumstances. He was educated by his mother and became proficient in art, especially

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    Essay Length: 622 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: March 11, 2010 By: regina
  • The Tyger by William Blake

    The Tyger by William Blake

    "The Tyger" Ana Melching 5-8-99 Does god create both gentle and fearful creatures? If he does what right does he have? Both of these rhetorical questions are asked by William Blake in his poem "The Tyger." The poem takes the reader on a journey of faith, questioning god and his nature. The poem completes a cycle of questioning the creator of the tyger, discussing how it could have been created, and then returns to questioning

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    Essay Length: 684 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: March 19, 2009 By: Fatih
  • Hatred Poisons Soul - William Blake's a Poison Tree

    Hatred Poisons Soul - William Blake's a Poison Tree

    Hatred Poisons Soul In William Blake’s, “A Poison Tree” a central metaphor of truth in human nature is expressed. It is a poem which teaches how anger can grow when nurtured with hate and become a deadly poison. The poem uses biblical points to reinforce this point along with clarity and understandable metaphors. The opening stanza sets up the entire poem, from the ending of anger with the “friend,” to the continuing anger with the

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    Essay Length: 485 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 15, 2009 By: David
  • The Lamb & the Tyger by William Blake

    The Lamb & the Tyger by William Blake

    The Lamb & The Tyger William Blake “The Lamb” and “The Tyger” are two different poems written by William Blake, the first taken from the Songs of Innocence and the second taken from the Songs of Experience. Both poems follow an A-A-B-B rhyme scheme and both focus on the topic of religion. Many sources have recommended the reading of the two poems together and I, myself, found that it was an experiment worth trying. When

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    Essay Length: 1,969 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: November 27, 2009 By: Tasha
  • William Blake

    William Blake

    1 The most fundamental aspect of William Blake’s poetry was his fluent use of contraries. These he used in a number of ways to convey his deepest sentiments of man. Blake had two strong opposing forces within him, which were; his views of man, and what he believed man should be. Blake felt bitter resentment toward the Industrial Revolution that had expanded around him. He had to use his poetic plea as a weapon

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    Essay Length: 1,052 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: December 3, 2009 By: Stenly
  • William Blake’s Chimney Sweeper Essay

    William Blake’s Chimney Sweeper Essay

    William Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper" offers a graphic portrayal of a particular cultural aspect of England in the 1790s. By examining my interactions with the poem, I will attempt to analyse and contrast my own belief system against that which is presented in the text. Blake's poem was initially very striking to me. While reading the first stanza, I was shocked and horrified by the imagery presented by the young narrator. I felt compelled to

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    Essay Length: 811 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 7, 2009 By: Monika
  • The Lamb Vs. the Rose: A Comparison of William Blake

    The Lamb Vs. the Rose: A Comparison of William Blake

    In the poem The Lamb, and the poem The Sick Rose, William Blake speaks in first person as though he is talking to someone. In The Lamb, Blake is talking to a lamb about the existence of that lamb and asking questions such as who created it, and who commands the lamb. In the second verse of the poem Blake continues on in first person, explaining to the lamb exactly who made it and

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    Essay Length: 728 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 9, 2009 By: Andrew
  • William Blakes the Tyger

    William Blakes the Tyger

    The Tyger By William Blake William Blake's poem The Tyger is a poem that alludes to the darker side of creation. He suggests that maybe when God created the earth and Jesus that he may have also created evil, “Did he who made the lamb make thee?”(Blake 1). The poem begins with the speaker asking a fearsome tiger what kind of divine being could have created it: "What immortal hand or eye/ could frame they

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    Essay Length: 646 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 18, 2009 By: Janna
  • Symbolism in William Blakes "the Rose"

    Symbolism in William Blakes "the Rose"

    In William Blake’s poem, “A Poison Tree”, Blake presents a story of developing anger, and the consequences of this anger if left unexpressed. Blake employs many metaphors to get the story across, some of which pertain to certain biblical imagery. The title of the poem itself uses “Tree” as a metaphor for growth or development. Thus, the poem is about a poisonous growth, which in this case, is anger. The first 4 lines of the

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    Essay Length: 288 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 22, 2009 By: Max
  • William Blake - Man Obsessed with the Divine

    William Blake - Man Obsessed with the Divine

    William Blake was a man desperately obsessed with the divine. In “the Sick Rose,” “the Lamb,” and “the Tyger” he clearly demonstrates this dedication to examining that fascination through the use of three very tangible metaphors. One doesn’t have to look very far to observe this fascination for it is readily evident in every stanza of these poems; the deeper meaning behind his words can sometimes get lost in the details. “The Lamb” is, at

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    Essay Length: 938 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 29, 2009 By: Jon
  • William Blake

    William Blake

    From William Blake’s “Chimney Sweeper”: And so Tom awoke and we rose in the dark And got with our bags and our brushes to work Though the morning was cold, Tom was happy and warm So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm In the wake of the French Revolution in the late 1700s, a political subtext can be seen in many of the literary works of that time. Such is evident

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    Essay Length: 789 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 5, 2010 By: Venidikt
  • The Garden of Love by William Blake

    The Garden of Love by William Blake

    The speaker of the poem tells of his visit to the Garden of Love and of the chapel that is now where he used to play as a child. Instead of welcoming him in, the chapel has 'Thou shalt not' of the Ten Commandments written over the door. The speaker sees that this negative morality has destroyed the garden as well, transforming the 'sweet flowers' to graves and tombstones. The emotionless ritual of the priests

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    Essay Length: 306 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 11, 2010 By: Yan
  • Comparision Between "the Fog" by Carll Sandburg and "the Sick Rose" by William Blake

    Comparision Between "the Fog" by Carll Sandburg and "the Sick Rose" by William Blake

    The poems “Fog” by Carl Sandburg and the “The Sick Rose” by William Blake have many similarities and differences. Both the poems use animals and bad weather in their content. “Fog” uses a cat and the fog while in the “The Sick Rose” there is a worm and a storm. The poets use the bad weather to create a sense of unhappiness to the reader as the bad weather stops normal events from happening. For

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    Essay Length: 615 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: February 26, 2010 By: Kevin
  • William Blake: A Marxist Before Marxism

    William Blake: A Marxist Before Marxism

    In his poem, “The Chimney Sweeper”, William Blake displays the despondent urban life of a young chimney sweeper during the coming of the industrial revolution in order to emphasize the theme of innocence through Marxism and to inform people of the harsh working conditions during the times of child labor promoting political reform. William Blake was born in London on November 28, 17, to James and Catherine Blake. From early childhood, Blake spoke of having

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    Essay Length: 1,918 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: February 28, 2010 By: Fonta
  • William Blake: From Innocence to Experience

    William Blake: From Innocence to Experience

    With his individual visions William Blake created new symbols and myths in the British literature. The purpose of his poetry was to wake up our imagination and to present the reality between a heavenly place and a dark hell. In his Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience he manages to do this with simplicity. These two types of poetry were written in two different stages of his life, consequently there could be seen a

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    Essay Length: 2,055 Words / 9 Pages
    Submitted: March 3, 2010 By: Mike
  • How Can God Create a Universe in Which Suffering Is Allowed? Discuss This in the Context of the Tyger by William Blake

    How Can God Create a Universe in Which Suffering Is Allowed? Discuss This in the Context of the Tyger by William Blake

    The Tyger is a poem by William Blake in which Blake examines the concept of suffering and how the creator could allow it to occur. This essay will discuss the concept of suffering in God’s universe, using The Tyger as a reference. One of the greatest mysteries of our existence is how God can allow the suffering of innocents. Daily we are bombarded with images of seemingly needless suffering, of children starving to death, diseases,

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    Essay Length: 535 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: March 19, 2010 By: Tasha
  • Jesus Is William Blake’s “the Lamb”?

    Jesus Is William Blake’s “the Lamb”?

    Jesus is William Blake’s “The Lamb”? William Blake’s poem, “The Lamb" is broken into two stanzas. Both stanzas have ten lines each. In the first part, each line rhymes with the next. There are a total of five rhyming parts in the first stanza. In the second stanza “name” and “Lamb” do not rhyme, but the other lines have the rhyming endings. The first two and the last two lines of each stanza are either

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    Essay Length: 410 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: April 8, 2010 By: Mike
  • Comparing William Blake and William Wordsworth

    Comparing William Blake and William Wordsworth

    Comparing Blake and Wordsworth William Blake and William Wordsworth were two of the most influential of all of the romantic writers, although neither was fully appreciated until years after his death. They grew up with very different lifestyles which greatly affected the way they as individuals viewed the world and wrote about it. Both play an important role in Literature today. Despite their differences, with their literature backgrounds they cannot help but have a

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    Essay Length: 818 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: April 17, 2010 By: Andrew
  • Apologia Analysis Essay of William J Clinton ’s Prayer Breakfast

    Apologia Analysis Essay of William J Clinton ’s Prayer Breakfast

    During his eight years as President of the United States, William J. Clinton had been allegedly involved in several scandals, although none as arguably infamous as the Monica Lewinsky scandal. The scandal concerned the concealed relationship between President Clinton, a married man, and Lewinsky, a twenty-one year old White House intern. Clinton had been publicly accused of having a sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky, an accusation he adamantly denied. Eventually, after an overwhelming amount of

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    Essay Length: 2,019 Words / 9 Pages
    Submitted: November 19, 2009 By: Steve
  • Mba 580 - Environmental Analysis: Sherwin Williams

    Mba 580 - Environmental Analysis: Sherwin Williams

    Running head: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS: SHERWIN WILLIAMS Environmental Analysis: Sherwin Williams MBA580 University of Phoenix Executive Summary An important step in developing an effective strategic plan for Sherwin Williams Paints is to scan the organization’s external environment in order to identify opportunities for strengthening the company and threats against the current and future successes over the next three to five years. In addition to scanning the external environment, the company’s internal environment was studied to establish

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    Essay Length: 4,613 Words / 19 Pages
    Submitted: December 1, 2009 By: Kevin
  • William Faulkner’s "a Rose for Emily" Character Analysis

    William Faulkner’s "a Rose for Emily" Character Analysis

    In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily,” the main character Emily Grierson is a woman completely isolated from her town. She has grown up her whole life in the same house, with the same butler, and primarily the company of only her father. In the eyes of the townspeople she is depicted as a “fallen monument” (526). She is a lonely woman who has fallen privy to her father’s and “crazy” relative’s skewed perceptions of

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    Essay Length: 329 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 30, 2009 By: Max
  • A Prayer for My Daughter Sailing to Byzantium and the Long-Legged Fly Analysis of William Butler Yeats

    A Prayer for My Daughter Sailing to Byzantium and the Long-Legged Fly Analysis of William Butler Yeats

    To contemporary readers, Yeats can seem baffling; he was opposed to the age of science, progress, democracy and modernization, and his occultist and mythological answers to those problems can seem horribly anachronistic for a poet who died barely sixty years ago, but what is strongly identifiable throughout Yeats writing his the personal honesty that he arrived at. In terms of the evolution of his poetic craft, With the brutal arrival of the new age of

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    Essay Length: 717 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 12, 2010 By: Victor

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