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6,106 Essays on Literature. Documents 181 - 210

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  • A Doll’s House

    A Doll’s House

    A Doll’s House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, tells the story of Nora, the wife of Torvald Helmer, who is an adult living as a child, kept as a doll by her husband. She is expected to be content and happy living in the world Torvald has created for her. By studying the play and comparing and contrasting the versions presented in the video and the live performance, one can analyze the different aspects

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    Essay Length: 1,548 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: January 14, 2010 By: Edward
  • A Doll’s House

    A Doll’s House

    A Doll's House The following essay will critically analyse a passage from the play "A Dolls House" by Henrik Ibsen. Between the pages 222 and 225 there seems to be shift in the plot, as Nora takes a different attitude towards her and Helmer's relationship. All of a sudden instead of trying to preserve it, she wishes to leave the house. It could be argued that her radical change in mind is not irrational or

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    Essay Length: 945 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: March 7, 2010 By: Jessica
  • A Doll’s House

    A Doll’s House

    Independence Most of us live a life where we do what we want and when we want without anyone telling us how to live our lives. This wasn’t the case in A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, where he illustrates to us how one woman lives a life through her father and husband. Throughout the play we see how a once childish like woman gains her independence and a life of her own. Ibsen shows

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    Essay Length: 596 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: April 20, 2010 By: David
  • A Doll’s House

    A Doll’s House

    Changes In “A Doll’s House” Written by Henrik Ibsen A Doll's House's central theme is change from society. This is demonstrated by several of its characters breaking away from the social standards of their time and acting on their own terms. No one character demonstrates this better than Nora. During the time in which the play took place society frowned upon women asserting themselves. Women were supposed to play a role in which they

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    Essay Length: 476 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: May 4, 2010 By: Anna
  • A Doll’s House - Henrik Ibsen

    A Doll’s House - Henrik Ibsen

    In “A Doll’s House,” Henrik Ibsen exposes the devastating affect society has on relationships. In the 1900’s when this play was written it is wrong for the women to show, and have more strength and intelligence than their husband. By looking at the title of the play, “A Doll’s House,” the reader can already question who is in charge of the play and who is the doll that is being controlled. As the reader reads

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    Essay Length: 480 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 7, 2009 By: Wendy
  • A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

    A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

    Women in the Late 19th Century A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, is a play about a woman who realizes that she is worth more than she has been given credit. Her whole life she was treated like a little doll; too fragile to do anything serious, too frail to be troubled with real business. She was the wife, mother and homemaker. The only things she was perceived as capable of were running the home,

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    Essay Length: 1,157 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: January 1, 2010 By: Yan
  • A Dose of Immaturity in Romeo and Juliet

    A Dose of Immaturity in Romeo and Juliet

    A Dose of Immaturity in Romeo and Juliet In William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet, both Romeo and Juliet are tragic heroes with tragic flaws. They both share the same tragic flaw, which is immaturity. This is illustrated when they “fall in love” before even getting to know each other. Also, their immaturity is shown when they fail to think their situation through before getting married without their parents’ consent. Romeo’s immaturity is what caused

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    Essay Length: 788 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: November 21, 2009 By: Anna
  • A Dream Worth Dreaming

    A Dream Worth Dreaming

    A Dream Worth Dreaming A Dream Worth Dreaming Although to the casual reader The Great Gatsby may only appear as a poetic muse on the seemingly endless rollercoaster that is love, if one plunges deeper into this novel it is easily discovered that not only is this the quintessential grail quest but it is quite plainly a search for the American dream. Gatsby plays a duel role in this piece of American history; he is

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    Essay Length: 357 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 4, 2010 By: Stenly
  • A Dwindling Faith

    A Dwindling Faith

    A Dwindling Faith “My eyes had opened and I was alone, terribly alone in a world without God…” (Wiesel 68). Most people would think hard times would strengthen people’s faith, that they would rely even more on their beliefs. But that is not always the case. In times of great crises, people’s faith may disintegrate to an almost nonexistent state. When people must look to physical things like food for survival, spiritual things like faith

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    Essay Length: 622 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 12, 2009 By: Fatih
  • A Face in Every Window

    A Face in Every Window

    A Face in Every Window You know how they say never to judge a book by its cover? Well, that is what I find myself doing before most books I read. Whether it is an assigned book as a class, or a choice book we have to read on our own. I usually look forward to books with a catchy cover or an interesting title, and those are the books I look forward to reading.

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    Essay Length: 1,037 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: February 14, 2010 By: Top
  • A Fading Beacon

    A Fading Beacon

    A Fading Beacon As humans, we require basic necessities, such as food, water, and shelter to survive. But we also need a reason to live. The reason could be the thought of a person, achieving some goal, or a connection with a higher being. Humans need something that drives them to stay alive. This becomes more evident when people are placed in horrific situations. In Elie Wiesel’s memoir Night, he reminisces about his experiences

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    Essay Length: 1,171 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: January 12, 2010 By: Mike
  • A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell to Arms is a novel by Ernest Hemingway about an American ambulance driver in Italy during World War I, and the nurse, Catherine Barkley, with whom he falls in love. The story is narrated by this driver, named Frederic Henry. Whether or not this book is truly an anti-war novel is debatable, but it well depicts the effects an ongoing war has on soldiers and how the men try to numb this pain.

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    Essay Length: 1,927 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: January 23, 2010 By: Mikki
  • A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a typical love story. A Romeo and his Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo is Frederick Henry and Juliet is Catherine Barkley. Their love affair must survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy adds to the tragedy of the love story. The war affects the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick must outlast

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    Essay Length: 1,069 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 16, 2010 By: Fonta
  • A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell To Arms Ernest Hemmingway’s “ A Farewell To Arms” is a classic display of literature. The way he develops his characters is ingenious. In the beginning of the story I did not like the way it was going. As I read deeper into the book, “A Farewell To Arms” I discovered the complexity of the characters themselves. I discovered that Frederic Henry was a rather complex character as well. When you are finally

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    Essay Length: 1,578 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: April 16, 2010 By: Edward
  • A Farewell to Arms

    A Farewell to Arms

    In A Farewell To Arms, the main focus of Ernest Hemingway (the author) is the title character’s involvement in the war and his love interest, Catherine Barkley. When Frederic Henry first meets Catherine it is just playful flirting. Then they soon learn that when they are together, they are able to escape the reality of the war. From there their relationship grows to one where Catherine and Henry need the war to take them away

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    Essay Length: 602 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: May 20, 2010 By: Mikki
  • A Farewell to Arms Written by Ernest Hemingway

    A Farewell to Arms Written by Ernest Hemingway

    The book A Farewell to Arms, written by Ernest Hemingway, is a classic about the love story of a nurse and a war ridden soldier. The story starts as Frederick Henry is serving in the Italian Army. He meets his future love in the hospital that he gets put in for various reasons. I thought that A Farewell to Arms was a good book because of the symbolism, the exciting plot, and the constant moving

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    Essay Length: 516 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: March 30, 2010 By: Monika
  • A Feminist Critique on Frankenstein

    A Feminist Critique on Frankenstein

    It is quite ironic that Mary Shelley, a woman who grew up daughter to the important Victorian feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, portrayed women in her most notable novel, Frankenstein, as passive beings inferior to their male counterparts. However, this farcical viewpoint is direct in pointing out the flawed treatment of women in society. Through her pessimistic portrayal of women, Shelley exhibits the typical attitude of women of the Victorian era in the nineteenth century. These characteristics

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    Essay Length: 533 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: March 4, 2010 By: Yan
  • A Feministic View on Jackson's Short Stories "the Lottery" and "the Tooth"

    A Feministic View on Jackson's Short Stories "the Lottery" and "the Tooth"

    Shirley Jackson is most famous for her short story �The Lottery’ and her novel �The Haunted House’. She has been applauded for her fresh approach towards American Gothic writing. There are many works dedicated to the gothic elements her stories contain. However, most critics overlooked the feminist elements that most of her stories have. The two short stories discussed in this essay both have female characters who are outsiders in their society. Careful examination of

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    Essay Length: 3,029 Words / 13 Pages
    Submitted: January 5, 2010 By: Fonta
  • A Few Words on Dante’s Inferno

    A Few Words on Dante’s Inferno

    A Few Words on Dante’s Inferno Like in the Inferno, where the gates of Hell begin the journey to the bottom, so life is began by birth, and the journey to Eternity begins. Some lives are more easily lead than others, like some of the punishments in Dante’s version of Hell are worse than others. Although in Hell, there is no hope, not even the hope of hope, the journey that Dante and Virgil take

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    Essay Length: 384 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 6, 2010 By: Jack
  • A Fine Balance Plot Summary

    A Fine Balance Plot Summary

    This story takes place in an unnamed coastal city in India during 1975-1984. This novel is told in third person and is about a chain of circumstances that tosses four very different people together into one small apartment. A college student, Maneck Kohlah, rents a room in the apartment of Dina Dalal, a widowed seamstress in her forties. Dina also has two additional boarders; Ishvar Darji and his nephew Omprakash; tailors fleeing low-caste origins.

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    Essay Length: 288 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 12, 2010 By: Mikki
  • A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict

    A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict

    Book Review Analysis Part I. A “Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict” by Peter Ackerman and Jack Duvall is a book that highlights revolutionary events and notable individuals in history. The book concentrates on strikes, boycotts, demonstrations, sit-ins, and civil organizations throughout a century. The principal argument of the book is that “nonviolent sanctions, if used effectively, can end oppression and liberate nations and peoples, and they can do so with less risk

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    Essay Length: 630 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: November 28, 2009 By: Andrew
  • A Funeral in My Brain

    A Funeral in My Brain

    Daniel Harouni July 13, 2005 Revised-Essay I Felt a Funeral in My Brian “I felt a funeral in my brain” by Emily Dickinson traces the speaker’s descent into madness. It is a terrifying poem for both the speaker and the reader. The speaker experiences the loss of self in the chaos of the unconscious, and the reader experiences the speaker’s descending madness and the horror most of us feel about going crazy. Dickinson uses

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    Essay Length: 447 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 15, 2010 By: Max
  • A Gathering of Old Men

    A Gathering of Old Men

    A Gathering of Old Men The integration of the white and black races is the most remarkable event of the second half of this century, surpassed only by two world wars in its significance. A Gathering of Old Men is a remarkable mystery about a young white woman and seventeen old black men in an isolated Louisiana township, each of whom confess to the murder of a brutal Cajun farmer. The simple symbols used

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    Essay Length: 306 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 27, 2010 By: Mike
  • A Gesture Life

    A Gesture Life

    Chang-rae lee, in A Gesture Life, pictures a Japanese immigrant named Franklin Hata. Hata have been seeking assimilation into the American society. To become part of the society, Hata tries to become the perfect citizen in the society, a “mascot” who everyone knows and respects. To further his assimilation, he tries to complete the picture of a whole and healthy family as many ideal Americans. Through adapting Sunny, Hata wants to assimilate through a parental

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    Essay Length: 1,107 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: November 18, 2009 By: Wendy
  • A Gift of Magic

    A Gift of Magic

    As the grandmother was dieing, she told her daughter, Elizabeth Garrett, that each one of her children would have a special gift. To Kirby she left the gift of dance. To Brendon, who wasn’t born yet, she left the gift of music. And to Nancy she left the gift of magic. Nancy can read people’s minds, know where they are at all times, and she can make them do what she wants. Growing up, her

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    Essay Length: 501 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 2, 2009 By: Andrew
  • A Golden Age - Book Review

    A Golden Age - Book Review

    Synopsis As Rehana Haque awakes one March morning, she may be forgiven for feeling happy. Today she will throw a party for her son and daughter. In the garden of the house she has built, her roses are blooming; her children are almost grown up; and beyond their doorstep, the city is buzzing with excitement after recent elections. Change is in the air. But none of the guests at Rehana's party can foresee what will

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    Essay Length: 1,404 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: April 28, 2010 By: Janna
  • A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    You are sitting in your living room at home watching the nightly news. The lead story for the night is about a family of four that were murdered. After seeing and hearing about something like that we often ask ourselves, What could possess a person enough to kill another human being? What is it that drives a person to kill? Will we ever know? Many authors use this unique mentality in short stories. They write

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    Essay Length: 1,153 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: December 14, 2009 By: Tommy
  • A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    Story Outline A Good man is Hard to Find” focuses on Christianity being filled with sin and punishment, good and evil, belief and unbelief. Title: A Good Man is Hard to Find Author: Flannery O’ Connor Setting: Characters: The grandmother; is not godly, prayerful, or trustworthy but she is a troublesome character. She raised her children without spirutuality, because she is not a believer, she is Godless. The Misfit; is the epitome of the Godless

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    Essay Length: 1,255 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: January 6, 2010 By: Kevin
  • A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    I feel that the Grandmother in the story “A Good Man is Hard to Find” suffer from psychological conditions. She does not care at all about anyone but herself. I feel that she may even be narcissistic. It is ironic because she would be expected to look out for her family. The Cambridge Dictionary defines narcissism as “too much interest in and admiration for your own physical appearance and/or your own abilities” It is ironic

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    Essay Length: 446 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: May 19, 2010 By: Steve
  • A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    A sudden appearance of the heart or meaning of something is what it took for the grandmother from Flannery O'Connor's short story "A Good Man is hard to find" to realize the moment of Grace that she receives before she is killed by the Misfit. O'Connor in her short story uses a lot of symbolism, including the characters. The misfit in this story and the grandmother share a special kind of relationship that neither

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    Essay Length: 889 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: May 5, 2011 By: loveable2332

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