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Psychology

After studying these essays on psychology, you'll have a better understanding of human behavior and of psychology in general.

3,002 Essays on Psychology. Documents 2,671 - 2,700

  • The Importance of Genes in Understanding Criminal Behaviour

    The Importance of Genes in Understanding Criminal Behaviour

    There are many schools of thought as to what causes a criminal to exhibit criminal behavior, but for the benefit of this essay the focus is going to be limited to the effects of genes on the understanding of criminal behaviour. However, it is important to bare in mind that not any one discipline can explain fully the causality of criminality and a multidisciplinary approach would offer more of an insight. Early biological research into

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    Essay Length: 855 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 23, 2009 By: Anna
  • The Influence of Alcohol Consumption on Human Behavior - How Alcohol Affect Critical Thinking

    The Influence of Alcohol Consumption on Human Behavior - How Alcohol Affect Critical Thinking

    Running Head: ALCOHOL VERSUS CRITICAL THINKING The Influence of Alcohol Consumption on Human Behavior: How Alcohol Affect Critical Thinking The Influence of Alcohol Consumption on Critical Thinking: How Alcohol Affect Human’s Perception Introduction Critical thinking is our ability to apply the law of logic on our everyday decision making processes based on the information and evidences that we have (Furedy & Furedy, 1985). Previous studies showed the strong relationship between alcohol and negative behaviors such

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    Essay Length: 2,732 Words / 11 Pages
    Submitted: December 27, 2009 By: Andrew
  • The Influence of Piaget’s 4 Stage Theory

    The Influence of Piaget’s 4 Stage Theory

    The Influence of Piaget’s 4 Stage Theory Jean Piaget was an influential psychologist who created the Four Stages of Cognitive Development. He believed when humans are in their infancy, childhood, and adolescence they try to understand the world through experiments. During cognitive development children are little scientists that create theories, experiment, and conclusions on how to adapt to the world. By the time children become adults they will be able to put into affect

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    Essay Length: 1,139 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: February 28, 2010 By: Wendy
  • The Influence of Technology on Adolecent Culture

    The Influence of Technology on Adolecent Culture

    Running head: THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY ON ADOLECENT CULTURE The Influence of Modern Technology among adolescents Within the United States of America Abstract Over the past decade, modern day society has implemented the growing use of technology as an every day occurrence. We have replaced books with computers, land lines with cell phones and handwritten notes with emails. Although this process has been gradually changing over time, it appears that within the last couple

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    Essay Length: 2,111 Words / 9 Pages
    Submitted: December 14, 2009 By: Fatih
  • The Influence of the Media on Teenage Anorexia

    The Influence of the Media on Teenage Anorexia

    The Influence of the Media on Teenage Anorexia Acknowledgements Firstly I would like to thank the Lord my God for His love and guidance in everything that I do including writing this dissertation. I would like to thank my family and friends for supporting me through the last three years of hard work. I want to thank my Dad who has always drummed it into my head since I was a little girl, that

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    Essay Length: 9,913 Words / 40 Pages
    Submitted: April 24, 2010 By: Tommy
  • The Integration of the Spirit

    The Integration of the Spirit

    The Integration of the Spirit "God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them" (Genesis 1:27 New International Version). When God created man and woman, he created them in totality with a mind or spirit so that they could know God, a heart or emotions so that they could love God, and He provided a will with freedom of choice so they could

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    Essay Length: 2,644 Words / 11 Pages
    Submitted: June 21, 2013 By: Grace
  • The Integumentary System

    The Integumentary System

    The Integumentary System The Integumentary System, consisting of the skin, hair and nails, act as a barrier to protect the body from the outside world. It also has several other functions in the body. The word INTEGUMENT comes from a Latin word that means to cover. The most important function of the integumentary system is protection. This system 1) serves as a barrier against infection and injury, 2) helps to regulate and maintain body temperature,

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    Essay Length: 279 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 31, 2010 By: Monika
  • The Island of Kauai

    The Island of Kauai

    On the Hawaiian island of Kauai, Emmy Werner and researchers conducted a longitudal study, which consists of two chief objectives. They first sought to “evaluate the long-term consequences of prenatal and perinatal stress, and second, to document the effects of adverse early rearing conditions on children’s physical, cognitive and psychosocial development.” This study will help researchers to understand how our “early environment” plays a role on our developmental outcome in life. Researchers also sought

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    Essay Length: 803 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 11, 2010 By: Artur
  • The Knight in Rusty Armor

    The Knight in Rusty Armor

    The Knight in Rusty Armor The Knight in rusty armor depicts our mental processes, or cognition that plays a complex and dramatic role in my life. I have learned that our cognition makes us human. I can cope only by first sensing and understanding my environment, just like the knight. sometimes I misperceive and wrongly interpret certain situations, causing problems for myself. My expectations and response partly determine how I see the world. My

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    Essay Length: 680 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 1, 2010 By: Mikki
  • The Letter People

    The Letter People

    I vividly remember an educational television show back in kindergarten (I am 19, this was back in 1992) an entire series my teacher, Ms. Kelly, showed the class throughout the year that still stays in my memory to this very day. This show was called The Letter People and was created in 1972 by a group in Waterbury, Connecticut called New Dimensions in Education. The principles were simple: This was an educational show that

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    Essay Length: 879 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 15, 2010 By: Anna
  • The Life and Theories of Sigmund Freud

    The Life and Theories of Sigmund Freud

    The Life and Theories of Sigmund Freud Introduction Sigmund Freud, and his psychoanalytic theory of mental illness, was clearly one of the most significant figures of the 20th century. He changed the way people look at themselves and at each other, as well as the way that medical science looks at mental illness. Formation of the Man Sigmund Freud was born on May 6, 1856 in Freiburg, Moravia (now part of the Czech Republic). His

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    Essay Length: 1,616 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: November 23, 2009 By: Artur
  • The Linwood Method and the Bio-Medical Approach: Two of the Competing Theories

    The Linwood Method and the Bio-Medical Approach: Two of the Competing Theories

    RUNNING HEAD: Competing Theories for Treatments of Autism The Linwood Method and the Bio-Medical Approach: Two of the Competing Theories For the Treatment of Patients with Autism Abstract The author of this paper gives and explanation of what autism is. He also tells you a b it about Jeanne Simons and why she created the Linwood Method and what it is. Then, in addition, you are given a description of who Dr. Jacquelyn McCandless

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    Essay Length: 1,829 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: January 4, 2010 By: Stenly
  • The Loe Moo

    The Loe Moo

    atertown, CT 06795 for a copy of their publication. House-sitting is much more more attractive to the average person. The only drawback is that most opportunities are for short terms, 3 months to a year. However, if you only want to locate to an area for a short period of time, this is the way to do it and live rent-free. Many people would rather have someone occupy their home during their absence than have

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    Essay Length: 824 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: June 11, 2010 By: Victor
  • The Lord of the Flies

    The Lord of the Flies

    The director borrows much symbolism from William Golding's novel, The Lord of the Flies, to help readers gain a greater understanding of his message. He uses symbolism in three important areas: objects that have symbolic value as references to ideas, characters that symbolize important historical and religious people, and the setting which frames the conflicts on the island in comparison to the whole world. Objects are the first part of the story that are

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    Essay Length: 828 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 3, 2010 By: David
  • The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

    The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

    The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat is a 1985 book by neurologist Oliver Sacks describing the case histories of some of Dr. Sacks's patients. The title of the book comes from the case study of a man with visual agnosia. The other essays in this book include: •"The Lost Mariner", about Jimmie G., who has lost the ability to form new memories due to Korsakoff's syndrome. He can remember nothing of his

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    Essay Length: 381 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 1, 2010 By: Tasha
  • The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: By Oliver Sacks

    The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: By Oliver Sacks

    The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: By Oliver Sacks Oliver Sacks wrote a collection of narratives titled, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, we see the suffering of those with neurological diseases, their attempts to cope with these diseases and the conclusions that Sacks makes on their conditions. Sacks is the physician in these narrative stories that tell about his studies of the person behind neurological deficits. Sacks’ interests

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    Essay Length: 1,500 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 16, 2010 By: Jessica
  • The Marijuana Controversy

    The Marijuana Controversy

    The Marijuana Controversy The General perspective that society throws on marijuana is that equal to any drug; negative. However, many researchers have found that the effects of marijuana for medicinal purposes can be beneficial to the right patients, as well as the United States government. The negative effects from marijuana use in a medicinal environment are far less than that of most over the counter drugs, while the benefits remain the same. There are instances

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    Essay Length: 838 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: March 13, 2010 By: July
  • The Meanings of a Word

    The Meanings of a Word

    Jared Sutton English 1101-02 Mr. Jones, M.A. October 13, 2010 ‘The Meanings of a Word' The subject of my paper is on a word that most everyone has heard at one time or another or may have used it. The word "Redneck" in my opinion can be used just as negatively as the word that is the subject in Gloria Naylor's essay "The Meanings of a Word." But in today's society the word Redneck which

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    Essay Length: 931 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: April 21, 2011 By: jsutton23
  • The Media and the Self-Image of Women

    The Media and the Self-Image of Women

    The Media and the Self-Image of Women Distorted and unattainable sexist mass images are the inevitable consequences of a social system in which those who are thin and big breasted benefit most. We as a society have created an environment so image obsessed that those with power give approval for being thin and disapproval for being fat, creating a generation of women so self conscious about their body image, that it is affecting their health.

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    Essay Length: 583 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 11, 2010 By: Janna
  • The Memory Combination: An Essay from Collabrative Works of Daniel L. Shacter, Scott Russell Sanders, and Loren Eiseley

    The Memory Combination: An Essay from Collabrative Works of Daniel L. Shacter, Scott Russell Sanders, and Loren Eiseley

    The Memory Combination I find a lot of truth in the crazy Marcel Proust’s theories on memories that Daniel L. Schacter, the author of Building Memories: Encoding and Retrieving the Present and the Past had included in his essay. Proust was considered crazy because of his obsession with memory and his decision to restrict himself from society for 15 years in order to write about personal recollections and the nature of memory (Schacter 173). I

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    Essay Length: 2,059 Words / 9 Pages
    Submitted: March 25, 2010 By: Monika
  • The Mental Disease Named Schizophrenia

    The Mental Disease Named Schizophrenia

    The Mental Disease Named Schizophrenia Some people may describe schizophrenia, a person who is afflicted with schizophrenia, as one who has lost their mind. Others may say that they are just sick people seeking attention. Well I am going to describe to you what I have learned about this mental disease. I will include the many symptoms, causes, and impacts this disorder brings into lives. There is a lot more to this disease than

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    Essay Length: 1,670 Words / 7 Pages
    Submitted: January 17, 2010 By: Vika
  • The Mental Simulation of Motor Incapacity in Depression

    The Mental Simulation of Motor Incapacity in Depression

    Running head: MENTAL SIMULATION IN DEPRESSION The Mental Simulation of Motor Incapacity in Depression Lisa M. Lindeman and Lyn Y. Abramson University of Wisconsin, Madison Abstract In depression, negative beliefs are coupled with profound physical weakness. Specifically, the belief that one is incapable of altering events in order to prevent expected negative outcomes or bring about positive outcomes leads to bodily symptoms characterized by low energy, slow motor movement and delays in the initiation of

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    Essay Length: 9,633 Words / 39 Pages
    Submitted: May 13, 2010 By: Mike
  • The Mind and Motivation of a Serial Killer

    The Mind and Motivation of a Serial Killer

    The mind and motivation of a serial killer Serial killers tend to be white heterosexual males in their twenties and thirties, who are sexually dysfunctional and have low self-esteem. Serial killers generally murder strangers with cooling off periods in between each murder. Serial killers are twisted in nature. Some return to the place the murder happened or the gravesite to fantasize about their deeds. Serial killers have made many excuses for their killings and

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    Essay Length: 801 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: January 14, 2010 By: Fatih
  • The Mind of a Serial Killer

    The Mind of a Serial Killer

    When investigating the twisted minds of a serial killer they use three main areas of investigational analysis; the micro level of analysis which investigates to function and the structure of the brain, the molecular level of analysis which investigates behavior, and the moral level which investigates the interactions of the individual on the people and the environment around him. When trying to catch a serial killer the behavioral analysis’s dig all the way down to

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    Essay Length: 480 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: January 12, 2010 By: July
  • The Mind-Body Connection

    The Mind-Body Connection

    The mind has an incredible power. We see it as we go through our everyday activities, constantly displaying the wonders of logic, thought, memory and creativity. Yet, can the mind be more powerful than we know? Is it possible to reduce or even eliminate pain, illness and disease by using the natural powers it possesses? Can the mind heal? Many of our finest researchers and scientists have explored that question, and while the exact answer

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    Essay Length: 1,922 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: January 11, 2009 By: Jon
  • The Mind-Body Connection

    The Mind-Body Connection

    Overview This paper will discuss the mind-body connection and it's relevance to health care professionals and to the public. It will explore the history of the mind-body connection, as well as state research that has been done on the subject. The reader will gain an understanding of the various techniques used in mind-body therapy, as well as their effectiveness. What is the Mind-Body Connection? It is the idea that the mind and body are not

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    Essay Length: 1,787 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: April 25, 2010 By: Andrew
  • The Missing Screw

    The Missing Screw

    The Turn of the Screw by Henry James can be interpreted in two main ways; as a psychological thriller or a ghost story. In the book, the central character and one of the narrators, the governess, has convinced herself that the children, Miles and Flora, are seeing apparitions. Another explanation is that she herself created these images through her madness. The governess desires so much to be loved that she drives herself insane. The

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    Essay Length: 754 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: March 5, 2010 By: Mike
  • The Mozart Effect

    The Mozart Effect

    The Mozart Effect Does classical music really help you study better? Many recent research studies show that music idoes in fact improve cognitive thinking. In 1993, researchers at the University of California at Irvine discovered the so-called Mozart Effect - that college students “who listened to ten minutes of Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D major K448 before taking an IQ test scored nine points higher” than when they had sat in silence

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    Essay Length: 1,001 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 28, 2010 By: Janna
  • The Mystery of Hypnosis

    The Mystery of Hypnosis

    The Mystery of Hypnosis There are three people sitting down on a stage, they are joined by a mysterious looking man in a suit and cape. With a smooth tone he tells the three people to close their eyes and listen to his voice. He then says, “You're feeling sleepy and your eyelids are feeling very heavy, at the count of three you will fall into a deep sleep, 1...2...3” and they all fall

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    Essay Length: 1,342 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 14, 2010 By: Vika
  • The Nature of the Mind

    The Nature of the Mind

    A leading exponent of the substantial view was George Berkeley, an 18th century Anglican bishop and philosopher. Berkeley argued that there is no such thing as matter and what humans see as the material world is nothing but an idea in God's mind, and that therefore the human mind is purely a manifestation of the soul. Few philosophers take an extreme view today, but the view that the human mind is of a nature or

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    Essay Length: 440 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 9, 2009 By: Mikki
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