EssaysForStudent.com - Free Essays, Term Papers & Book Notes
Search

Philosophy

After studying some philosophical works on our website, you'll be able to write coursework on any topic with ease.

2,216 Essays on Philosophy. Documents 2,071 - 2,100

Go to Page
  • Universal Truths: If Knowledge Can Create Problems, It Is Not Through Ignorance That We Can Solve Them

    Universal Truths: If Knowledge Can Create Problems, It Is Not Through Ignorance That We Can Solve Them

    Through one of his profound quotes: “If knowledge can create problems, it is not through ignorance that we can solve them”, Isaac Asimov shows his perception for knowledge and ignorance as well as to what they lead. Based on his thought, the expansion of knowledge leads to expansion of problems while ignorance responds to smaller number of troubles and struggles. More knowledge causes more uncertainties and harder life whereas ignorance simplifies people’s way of living

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,187 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: April 20, 2010 By: Bred
  • Until We Meet Again

    Until We Meet Again

    Quintan Dennis 06/03/08 Block 2 English/Mr. Wright Until We Meet Again The summer for Darcy Willis is supposed to be different. It is at the end of the school year and Darcy is expecting one of the best times of her life. But her plans were broken by a bunch of unexpecting events that took place. One of them was that her boyfriend for almost a year Hakeem Randell was moving away to Detroit. Another

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 669 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 10, 2009 By: Tasha
  • Up Series: 35 Up

    Up Series: 35 Up

    Up 35 I strongly feel that a person needs to have the ability to change his character in order to truly be free. I do understand what Tony says in one of the earlier films about him being fake if he changes; however, to just have the ability is what makes a man free. If I had to pick one, I would say that not trying to alter your character, to any degree, shows a

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 829 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 12, 2009 By: Fonta
  • Use of Logic in Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Use of Logic in Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail Logic affects our lives everyday. We use it both subconsciously and consciously to make decisions which can be as important as our careers, or as insignificant as what to eat for lunch. Logic can also be used in other ways. Ironically, others' bad logic can result in us learning something just as much as we learn from our own bad decisions. This is shown in Monty Python's Quest for

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 461 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 24, 2009 By: Mike
  • Using the Concepts of the Knowing Self and the Situated Self, in Which You Critically Reflect on How Your Background Has Influenced You as a Learner.

    Using the Concepts of the Knowing Self and the Situated Self, in Which You Critically Reflect on How Your Background Has Influenced You as a Learner.

    In this essay I will briefly outline my understanding of the concepts of the situated and knowing self. I will then reflect on how my background has influenced me as a learner and in doing this I apply the concepts to my discussion. My understanding of the concept of the situated self is that it is the aspect of the self that involves cultural and social background and the surroundings of the self. The situated

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 489 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: April 19, 2010 By: Tommy
  • Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair?

    Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair?

    Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair? Jonathan Murphy 12/9/2005 Nietzsche Dr.Shapiro Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair? Understanding Nietzsche's political theory is no simple task. Perhaps because of his lack of faith in "philosophical system-building" as Daniel Conway describes it, Nietzsche doesn't take a traditional tact in explaining his politics. Nietzsche's writing style and the deconstructive nature of his thought are not conducive to that kind of logical structure. Also, the aphoristic structures

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 628 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 21, 2010 By: Mike
  • Uthopia

    Uthopia

    It has often been said that Utopian societies are an impossibility. That the so-called "human condition" and man's "inhumanity to man" will preclude it. Well why? Or rather when your philosophy 101 professor asks the classic question "why?" The classic answer is or should be "why not!" If we can conceive of it, if we can dream it, we can do it, we can make it happen. Nothing is impossible. The first problem is the

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 944 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 30, 2009 By: Bred
  • Utilitarian - Are Consequences the only Thing to Consider?

    Utilitarian - Are Consequences the only Thing to Consider?

    Are Consequences the Only Thing to Consider? Theories of ethical and moral development are based upon the society and time in which the philosophers believe that they are able to change the world and make their mark on people’s lives through their values and ideas. Not always will a philosopher’s ideas meet the standards to withhold the challenges that people or society as a whole will challenge them with. The Utilitarian theory looks at the

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 2,386 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: November 19, 2009 By: Bred
  • Utilitarian Justification of Euthanasia

    Utilitarian Justification of Euthanasia

    This was a very inspirational reading to me. I feel Martin Luther King Jr. was not only a leader for black civil rights but rights for all injustice towards minorities everywhere. He brings up great ideas for defining just and unjust laws. I agree with him when he says an unjust law is no law at all and should be denied in order to be just. When one becomes complacent towards injustice he is committing

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 276 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 13, 2010 By: Monika
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism In general, the philosophical idea of utilitarianism refers to the idea that choices or decisions should be based on maximizing positive consequences, that is produce the most good for the most people given equal consideration all involved. Utilitarian theory does not focus on the well-being of an individual, but maximizes the well-being of society as a whole. This ethical philosophy best describes the morality (goodness) of actions in terms of how effectively the actions

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 784 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 17, 2009 By: Tommy
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    In Ethics: Selections from Classical and Contemporary Writers by Oliver A. and Johnson A. Reath, utilitarian is when the "right action should aim at producing the most good in the world in some impartial fashion---in particular that it should aim at increasing happiness and well-being and minimizing suffering." (Qut. Ethics: Selections from Classical and Contemporary Writers by Oliver A. and Johnson 320) Thus, this means that as long as an action can produce the greatest

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 305 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 2, 2010 By: Vika
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism says that the moral and ethical thing to do is that which provides the most happiness or the least unhappiness to society. Sitting in class listening to the lecture on the moral theory of Utilitarianism it first sounded like the best moral theory ever. However as the classes continued and we learned more and more about this theory my opinion quickly changed. In this paper I will defend the idea that Utilitarianism is a

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,136 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 10, 2010 By: Top
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentiality issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experience; however, no method of reconciling an individual decision with

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,325 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 21, 2010 By: Venidikt
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism could be summed up by the phrase "the greatest happiness for the greatest number." The idea was first coined by Francis Hutcheson (1694- 1746) who wrote a book called "An inquiry into the original of our ideas of beauty and virtue" Although strictly speaking he is not a Utilitarian; he laid down the very basic ideas of this theory. The theory of utility is later on put forward by David Hume a Scottish philosopher.

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,278 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 28, 2010 By: Jack
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Mill's Utilitarianism brings an extended concept of Bentham's philosophy and a response to Kant's deontological philosophy. The basic concept of utilitarianism is to act in such a way as to create the most pleasure or the least pain. This is the guideline because, as Mill states, we desire happiness; happiness is maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain. However, is utilitarianism viable? There are many arguments for it, but just as many against. First, utilitarianism allows for

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,137 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: April 8, 2010 By: Mike
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism Utilitarianism is the ethical theory proposed by John Stuart Mill that says all actions should be directed toward achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. Utilitarianism is a concept that holds an action to be held right if it tends to promote happiness for the greatest number of people. Utilitarianism is a tradition stemming from the late 18th- and 19th-century English philosophers and economists Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill that

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 808 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: May 26, 2010 By: Jack
  • Utilitarianism & Shopenhauer on Abortion

    Utilitarianism & Shopenhauer on Abortion

    PHI 1030 Nancy L. Brown, Ph. D. April 14, 2008 Abortion Jane is a twenty year-old unmarried college student that found herself unexpectedly pregnant. While considering her options, she visits Arthur and John. Arthur is a well known philosopher specializing in the Schopenhauer philosophy. John on the other hand is a well known Utilitarian author. While Jane spends a couple days visiting these two philosophers, I went with her to document her journey. Jane first

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 2,586 Words / 11 Pages
    Submitted: December 14, 2009 By: Artur
  • Utilitarianism and Animal Rights

    Utilitarianism and Animal Rights

    Animal Rights Throughout history morality has been a topic of intense debate. Innumerable thinkers have devoted immense amounts of time and energy to the formulation of various ethical theories intended to assist humans in their daily lives. These theories set out guidelines which help to determine the rightness or wrongness of any given action and can therefore illuminate which choice would be morally beneficial. And while many of these theories differ substantially, most have at

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 514 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 2, 2010 By: July
  • Utilitarianism and the Lonesome Stranger

    Utilitarianism and the Lonesome Stranger

    Utilitarianism and the Lonesome Stranger Utilitarianism is the ethical theory that believes one should do what will promote the greatest utility for as many people as possible, that utility is often considered to be happiness or pleasure. There are different kinds of utilitarian views; hedonistic, preference, rule, and act to name a few, but they all have the same main objective. This theory does indeed seem good at first, but it is flawed. The case

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 962 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: November 23, 2009 By: Top
  • Utilitarianism Mill

    Utilitarianism Mill

    Mill's Utilitarianism When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentialist issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experience; however, no method of reconciling an individual

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,317 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 31, 2010 By: Top
  • Utilitarianism Stuart Vs Mill

    Utilitarianism Stuart Vs Mill

    One of the major players in ethical theories has long been the concept of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism states that in general the ethical rightness or wrongness of an action is directly related to the utility of that action. Utility is more specifically defined as a measure of the goodness or badness of the consequences of an action. Utility is considered to be the tendency to produce happiness. There are two types of Utilitarianism; "act" and "rule".

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,015 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: November 29, 2009 By: July
  • Utopia

    Utopia

    "Travel and Trade" Citizens are free to travel throughout Utopia, though they must get the prince's permission. Leaving without permission brings severe punishment. All cities share their surpluses with cities in need, and when all need has been met, they sell their surpluses abroad. Utopians keep a large store of money in the treasury and generally use it in wartime. "Their Gold and Silver" Utopians have so much gold and silver that they use it

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 382 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 6, 2010 By: Tasha
  • Utopia

    Utopia

    Utopia (from Greek: οὐ no, and τόπος, place, i.e. "no place" or "place that does not exist") is a fictional island near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean written about by Sir Thomas More as the fictional character Raphael Hythloday (translated from the Greek as "knowing in trifles") recounts his experiences in his travels to the fictional island with a perfect social, legal, and political system. It may be used pejoratively, to refer to a

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 848 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: April 1, 2010 By: Tommy
  • Utopia : A Perfect Place?

    Utopia : A Perfect Place?

    Utopia :often Utopia An ideally perfect place, especially in its social, political, and moral aspects, and an impractical, idealistic scheme for social and political reform. Each person has their own vision of utopia, the above sentance is Oxford's Dictionary's definition of it. Utopia means an ideal state, a paradise, a land of enchantment. It has been a central part of the history of ideas in Western Civilization. Philosophers and writers continue to imagine and conceive

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 997 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 28, 2009 By: Monika
  • Utopian Society

    Utopian Society

    Virtually every culture has strived to achieve a Utopian society. A Utopian society is basically a society, which has surpassed aggression, war, hate, and crime while establishing "peaceful" and orderly communities. A Utopian society could not exist with the individuality that nature has bestowed on the human race. So long as humans remain unique in their state of mind, utopia is a mere fantasy. To work around this problem a society must adapt itself to

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 436 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 11, 2010 By: Andrew
  • Utopian Society

    Utopian Society

    UTOPIANS-DREAMERS B. F. SKINNER (1904- ) Despite acknowledging that his controversial theories discourage personal freedom, if not doing away with it altogether, Skinner feels that his methods of behavior modification are the only viable means to insure a stable and productive human future. His Utopia: WALDEN TWO The utopia described in Skinner's 1948 book, Walden Two, is a fictional community based on the principles of a totally engineered life-style, from material goods to human behavior.

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 326 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: May 3, 2010 By: regina
  • Utopias and Europe

    Utopias and Europe

    don't need to tell you that the new Gene Wolfe novel, Soldier of Sidon, is wonderful, do I? Of course not. But I'm going to anyway. Latro, or Lucius the Roman as Wolfe has finally admitted he should really be known, is in Egypt. This is a fine place for him to be. After all, if one is blessed with the ability to see the gods, what better place to go. Egypt, it sometimes seems,

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 303 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 2, 2010 By: Jack
  • Utopic Dreams

    Utopic Dreams

    Utopic Dreams The philosophical questions like “what should be the ideal world?” have been asked among people, who have reached the average living standards and had time to think and discuss. In the book “Republic” written in 380 B.C. by Plato, Socrates, Plato’s teacher, explains how to create the perfect city and interrogates himself and his interlocuters, to find out to the way to the best society. Socrates thinks that in order to set up

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,487 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 20, 2010 By: Steve
  • Utulitarianism

    Utulitarianism

    UTILITARIANISM by John Stuart Mill (1863) Chapter 2 What Utilitarianism Is. A PASSING remark is all that needs be given to the ignorant blunder of supposing that those who stand up for utility as the test of right and wrong, use the term in that restricted and merely colloquial sense in which utility is opposed to pleasure. An apology is due to the philosophical opponents of utilitarianism, for even the momentary appearance of confounding them

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 8,675 Words / 35 Pages
    Submitted: December 6, 2009 By: Andrew
  • Value in an Ethical Context

    Value in an Ethical Context

    I understand value, from an ethical point of view, to be an essential constituent or characteristic of a human. It is learned as a child, expressed and built upon throughout your existence. There are values that are consistent throughout several different societies, as well as contrasting ones, forming a unique way of living. Value is learned. Your parents raise you the same values as they believe to be true. They place upon you an inherent

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 503 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: November 21, 2009 By: Janna

Go to Page
Search
Advanced Search