EssaysForStudent.com - Free Essays, Term Papers & Book Notes
Search

Philosophy

After studying some philosophical works on our website, you'll be able to write coursework on any topic with ease.

2,231 Essays on Philosophy. Documents 2,071 - 2,100

Go to Page
  • Turing Machine

    Turing Machine

    A turing machine can be defined as a "device with a finite number of internal configurations, each of which involves the machine's being in one of a finite number of states". This means that in a machine there are certain inputs that when implemented will produce a certain output. These combinations of inputs can be used in a machine table to show the outputs for each state. By looking at a machine table one will

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 413 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 22, 2009 By: Kevin
  • Tv Violence

    Tv Violence

    i dont wantViolence Caused by T.V. Televisions growing popularity in the 1950's gradually gave way to the effects of violence during society. Leading up to today, children repeatedly commit acts of violence seen on television, through aggressiveness and desensitizing. These effects may be noticeable in the child's early stages of life or in adulthood. Illustrated in various examples through out the essay are the identification and effects of television violence, and ways to reduce the

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 408 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 13, 2009 By: Mike
  • Two Conceptions of Freedom or Two Appearances of a Single Conception?

    Two Conceptions of Freedom or Two Appearances of a Single Conception?

    In his essay "Two Concepts of Liberty," Isaiah Berlin distinguishes between two conceptions of freedom, namely negative and positive conception of freedom. Basically he defines negative liberty as the absence of coercion. He states: "To coerce a man is to deprive him of freedom" (121). According to him, coercion is the intention to interfere in the freedom of an individual. Thus, absence of coercion is absence of deliberate, intentional coercion. For him, negative liberty requires

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 381 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: April 3, 2010 By: Kevin
  • Two Critical Analyses of Hemingway’s "hills like White Elephants"

    Two Critical Analyses of Hemingway’s "hills like White Elephants"

    Two Critical Analyses of Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" In "Hills Like White Elephants: The Jilting Of Jig," Nilofer Hashmi explores the many different layers of symbolism, the role of the American male, and the possible outcomes of the story. The use of symbolism is great in this story; therefore Hashmi uses the words of many critics to get through the various layers that the symbolism poses. Hashmi uses Doris Lanier's argument for support in

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,004 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: January 15, 2010 By: Victor
  • Two Main Theories of How to Reward

    Two Main Theories of How to Reward

    Discuss two main theories of how to reward. Which is the best theory and why? The two main theories of how to reward are retributivist and utilitarian. Retributivist is the theory of that they ought to be rewarded for what they have done and rewarding people for their efforts. They are not concerned with rewarding people with incentives to do more work and better or the consequences it may have in the future. The other

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 667 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: May 18, 2011 By: trewcy
  • Ulitarianism

    Ulitarianism

    “Utilitarianism is the ethical doctrine that the moral worth of an action is solely determined by its contribution to overall utility in maximizing happiness or pleasure as summed among all persons.”- Wikipedia. This means that a person should do everything in his power to achieve ultimate bliss. Good is what brings happiness to most people in the world. This principle is based on decisions that human kind makes. These decisions are based of benefit, with

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,396 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: February 22, 2010 By: Anna
  • Umm My First Essay-Do Not Use

    Umm My First Essay-Do Not Use

    Jainism is one of the oldest religions. A detailed discussion of Jain history would be very long. It covers many different periods of history. I have divided the time-scale into seven periods so that we can correlate the events within the Jain history, and can also relate the history of Jainism with other events in India and outside of India. You will note that several famous philosophers were contemporary of Lord Mahavira, and that 13-15th

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 254 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 27, 2010 By: Stenly
  • Un Secretary General Kofi Annan once Remarked That "the World Cannot Stand Aside When Gross and Systematic Violations of Human Rights Are Taking Place". What Is Needed, He Said, Are "legitimate and Universal Principles" on Which Intervention Can Be Based

    Un Secretary General Kofi Annan once Remarked That "the World Cannot Stand Aside When Gross and Systematic Violations of Human Rights Are Taking Place". What Is Needed, He Said, Are "legitimate and Universal Principles" on Which Intervention Can Be Based

    Morality is not about, what we should not do, but about what we should do. It is about doing the right thing. It is about how we should live our lives. No one seems to have the power to control another's actions and life. In order to find out if anyone has power, the source or basis of morality has to be established. With regards to this, there are four schools of thought. The four

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,429 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 16, 2010 By: Max
  • Unconventional Women

    Unconventional Women

    In an old Hebrew myth, scribed in medieval times, Adam had a wife prior to the complacent, obedient Eve; her name was Lilith. Lilith was created not from rib, but from the same dust as Adam. As the story goes, Lilith refused to lie beneath Adam, stating that they were equals. When Adam tried to force her into compliance, she fled to the treacherous Red Sex. Considered a demoness by all accounts, she sat on

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,199 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: February 2, 2010 By: Andrew
  • Understanding Descartes' Method of Doubt

    Understanding Descartes' Method of Doubt

    Understanding Descartes' Method of Doubt Clear your mind, if you will, of everything you have ever seen or known to be true. To begin understanding Rene Descartes' method of doubt, you need to suspend all prejudice and prior judgments and start with a clean slate "for the purpose of discovering some ultimate truth on which to base all thought." (Kolak, Pg.225). Discouraged with much skepticism from his own beliefs, Descartes was embarrassed of his own

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 943 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: November 20, 2009 By: Fatih
  • Understanding Dostoevsky

    Understanding Dostoevsky

    While confronting Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground seems a difficult task initially, one must be able to transcend the elaborate diction and parodies, and comprehend the author himself, while also taking root the message Dostoevsky had originally intended in the time it was addressed. Understanding the author himself, along with the period in which the work was written, augments one's overall discernment of the passage. In the age he wrote, Dostoevsky must have seemed eccentric and

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 499 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 27, 2009 By: Mike
  • Unexamined Life

    Unexamined Life

    Socrates Socrates was probably the greatest philosopher of all time and yet he never wrote a single line. He had a great influence on many other philosophers, if Socrates didn't existed, we would never have heard about Plato, Aristotle and others famous characters. He was well known for his public conversation skill. Sadly, he offended the wrong people and he had been giving the choice to be executed or exiled. He chose death, which made

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 299 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: December 19, 2009 By: Vika
  • Unexamined Life

    Unexamined Life

    Life, an awe inspiring sequence of events that provokes love, hatred, generosity and joy that once examined in fine detail brings itself to each harmonious climax. But what if life remains unexamined? The love, the hatred, the generosity and the joy remain still and motionless without any release, and life is no longer worth living. Therefore, the unexamined life is not worth living. By defining the examination, the worth and the life, we can give

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 465 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 13, 2010 By: Bred
  • Unexamined Life Is Not Worth Living

    Unexamined Life Is Not Worth Living

    Goal of the Course: The general goal of this course is to consider what philosophers call the Socratic commitment. Socrates, a Greek philosopher, 470-399 B.C., was placed on trial in Athens because he questioned the political, moral, and religious practices of Athens. He gave his own defense which his pupil Plato recorded as The Apology (The Defense). When he was convicted for impiety to the gods and for corrupting the youth because he had taught

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,828 Words / 8 Pages
    Submitted: February 21, 2010 By: Max
  • Unintended Consequences in Antigone

    Unintended Consequences in Antigone

    Unintended consequences are situations where an action results in an outcome that is not what is intended. The unintended results may be foreseen or unforeseen, but they are almost always logical or likely results of the action. These consequences could be positive or negative, but it is often said that almost all human actions have at least one unintended consequence. In other words, each cause has more than one effect, including unforeseen effects. A real-world

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,152 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: January 1, 2010 By: Tasha
  • Universal Truths: If Knowledge Can Create Problems, It Is Not Through Ignorance That We Can Solve Them

    Universal Truths: If Knowledge Can Create Problems, It Is Not Through Ignorance That We Can Solve Them

    Through one of his profound quotes: “If knowledge can create problems, it is not through ignorance that we can solve them”, Isaac Asimov shows his perception for knowledge and ignorance as well as to what they lead. Based on his thought, the expansion of knowledge leads to expansion of problems while ignorance responds to smaller number of troubles and struggles. More knowledge causes more uncertainties and harder life whereas ignorance simplifies people’s way of living

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,187 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: April 20, 2010 By: Bred
  • Until We Meet Again

    Until We Meet Again

    Quintan Dennis 06/03/08 Block 2 English/Mr. Wright Until We Meet Again The summer for Darcy Willis is supposed to be different. It is at the end of the school year and Darcy is expecting one of the best times of her life. But her plans were broken by a bunch of unexpecting events that took place. One of them was that her boyfriend for almost a year Hakeem Randell was moving away to Detroit. Another

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 669 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: December 10, 2009 By: Tasha
  • Up Series: 35 Up

    Up Series: 35 Up

    Up 35 I strongly feel that a person needs to have the ability to change his character in order to truly be free. I do understand what Tony says in one of the earlier films about him being fake if he changes; however, to just have the ability is what makes a man free. If I had to pick one, I would say that not trying to alter your character, to any degree, shows a

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 829 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 12, 2009 By: Fonta
  • Use of Logic in Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Use of Logic in Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail Logic affects our lives everyday. We use it both subconsciously and consciously to make decisions which can be as important as our careers, or as insignificant as what to eat for lunch. Logic can also be used in other ways. Ironically, others' bad logic can result in us learning something just as much as we learn from our own bad decisions. This is shown in Monty Python's Quest for

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 461 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: November 24, 2009 By: Mike
  • Using the Concepts of the Knowing Self and the Situated Self, in Which You Critically Reflect on How Your Background Has Influenced You as a Learner.

    Using the Concepts of the Knowing Self and the Situated Self, in Which You Critically Reflect on How Your Background Has Influenced You as a Learner.

    In this essay I will briefly outline my understanding of the concepts of the situated and knowing self. I will then reflect on how my background has influenced me as a learner and in doing this I apply the concepts to my discussion. My understanding of the concept of the situated self is that it is the aspect of the self that involves cultural and social background and the surroundings of the self. The situated

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 489 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: April 19, 2010 By: Tommy
  • Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair?

    Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair?

    Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair? Jonathan Murphy 12/9/2005 Nietzsche Dr.Shapiro Using the Political Nietzsche: Hope or Despair? Understanding Nietzsche's political theory is no simple task. Perhaps because of his lack of faith in "philosophical system-building" as Daniel Conway describes it, Nietzsche doesn't take a traditional tact in explaining his politics. Nietzsche's writing style and the deconstructive nature of his thought are not conducive to that kind of logical structure. Also, the aphoristic structures

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 628 Words / 3 Pages
    Submitted: January 21, 2010 By: Mike
  • Uthopia

    Uthopia

    It has often been said that Utopian societies are an impossibility. That the so-called "human condition" and man's "inhumanity to man" will preclude it. Well why? Or rather when your philosophy 101 professor asks the classic question "why?" The classic answer is or should be "why not!" If we can conceive of it, if we can dream it, we can do it, we can make it happen. Nothing is impossible. The first problem is the

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 944 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 30, 2009 By: Bred
  • Utilitarian - Are Consequences the only Thing to Consider?

    Utilitarian - Are Consequences the only Thing to Consider?

    Are Consequences the Only Thing to Consider? Theories of ethical and moral development are based upon the society and time in which the philosophers believe that they are able to change the world and make their mark on people’s lives through their values and ideas. Not always will a philosopher’s ideas meet the standards to withhold the challenges that people or society as a whole will challenge them with. The Utilitarian theory looks at the

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 2,386 Words / 10 Pages
    Submitted: November 19, 2009 By: Bred
  • Utilitarian Justification of Euthanasia

    Utilitarian Justification of Euthanasia

    This was a very inspirational reading to me. I feel Martin Luther King Jr. was not only a leader for black civil rights but rights for all injustice towards minorities everywhere. He brings up great ideas for defining just and unjust laws. I agree with him when he says an unjust law is no law at all and should be denied in order to be just. When one becomes complacent towards injustice he is committing

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 276 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: February 13, 2010 By: Monika
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism In general, the philosophical idea of utilitarianism refers to the idea that choices or decisions should be based on maximizing positive consequences, that is produce the most good for the most people given equal consideration all involved. Utilitarian theory does not focus on the well-being of an individual, but maximizes the well-being of society as a whole. This ethical philosophy best describes the morality (goodness) of actions in terms of how effectively the actions

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 784 Words / 4 Pages
    Submitted: December 17, 2009 By: Tommy
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    In Ethics: Selections from Classical and Contemporary Writers by Oliver A. and Johnson A. Reath, utilitarian is when the "right action should aim at producing the most good in the world in some impartial fashion---in particular that it should aim at increasing happiness and well-being and minimizing suffering." (Qut. Ethics: Selections from Classical and Contemporary Writers by Oliver A. and Johnson 320) Thus, this means that as long as an action can produce the greatest

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 305 Words / 2 Pages
    Submitted: March 2, 2010 By: Vika
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism says that the moral and ethical thing to do is that which provides the most happiness or the least unhappiness to society. Sitting in class listening to the lecture on the moral theory of Utilitarianism it first sounded like the best moral theory ever. However as the classes continued and we learned more and more about this theory my opinion quickly changed. In this paper I will defend the idea that Utilitarianism is a

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,136 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: March 10, 2010 By: Top
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and in evaluating the consequentiality issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experience; however, no method of reconciling an individual decision with

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,325 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 21, 2010 By: Venidikt
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism could be summed up by the phrase "the greatest happiness for the greatest number." The idea was first coined by Francis Hutcheson (1694- 1746) who wrote a book called "An inquiry into the original of our ideas of beauty and virtue" Although strictly speaking he is not a Utilitarian; he laid down the very basic ideas of this theory. The theory of utility is later on put forward by David Hume a Scottish philosopher.

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,278 Words / 6 Pages
    Submitted: March 28, 2010 By: Jack
  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Mill's Utilitarianism brings an extended concept of Bentham's philosophy and a response to Kant's deontological philosophy. The basic concept of utilitarianism is to act in such a way as to create the most pleasure or the least pain. This is the guideline because, as Mill states, we desire happiness; happiness is maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain. However, is utilitarianism viable? There are many arguments for it, but just as many against. First, utilitarianism allows for

    Rating:
    Essay Length: 1,137 Words / 5 Pages
    Submitted: April 8, 2010 By: Mike

Go to Page
Search
Advanced Search